Whales Today Lectures explore whale ecology, ocean health, and marine mammal conservation

October 5, 24 & November 16 at New Bedford Whaling Museum

New Bedford, Mass. – In conjunction with a major expansion of its whale ecology and conservation exhibition Whales Today, the New Bedford Whaling Museum presents lectures this fall focusing on whale ecology, ocean health, and marine mammal conservation. Alex Bocconcelli, Research Specialist, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute, will speak about Blue Whales of Patagonia on October 5. Greg Skomal, Senior Marine Fisheries Scientist, Massachusetts Marine Fisheries, presents Seeing Deeper into the World of the White Shark on October 24. On November 16, Stephen Connett will speak about Sea Turtles: Conservation, Research, and Education. A reception for each lecture begins at 6 pm with the lectures beginning at 7 pm. Tickets for each lecture cost $10 for Whaling Museum Members and $15 for non-members. To register visit www.whalingmuseum.org or call 508-997-0046.

Lecture Descriptions

Blue Whales of Patagonia
Alex Bocconcelli, Research Specialist, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute
Thursday, October 5

Bocconcelli shows how research being conducted on blue whales in northern Patagonia can influence policy to better protect the unique marine mammal habitat in the Gulf of Corcovado and the Moraleda Channel.

Photo courtesy Alex Bocconcelli.

Seeing Deeper into the World of the White Shark
Greg Skomal, Senior Marine Fisheries Scientist, Massachusetts Marine Fisheries
Tuesday, October 24

Cape Cod is now the only known aggregating site for white sharks in the North Atlantic. To take advantage of this opportunity, the Massachusetts Shark Research Program has been studying the biology and abundance of this species since 2009.Lead scientist Skomal discusses his work and how new technologies are providing novel insights into this historically elusive species.

Photo Credit: Wayne Davis

Sea Turtles: Conservation, Research, and Education
Stephen Connett, Archie Carr Center for Sea Turtle Research, University of Florida
Thursday, November 16

Sea turtles are extraordinary animals yet vulnerable to anthropogenic pressures. All sea turtle populations are endangered. Many conservation efforts have had extraordinary results, but long-term success depends on education and reduced human impact on the coastal and ocean environments.

Photo courtesy of Stephen Connett.

For images contact:
Tina Malott
Director of Marketing & Public Relations
New Bedford Whaling Museum
tmalott@whalingmuseum.org
508-717-6840


About the New Bedford Whaling Museum
The New Bedford Whaling Museum is the world's most comprehensive museum devoted to the global story of human interaction with whales through time, and the history and culture of the South Coast region. The cornerstone of New Bedford Whaling National Historical Park, the Museum is located at 18 Johnny Cake Hill in the heart of the city's historic downtown. Museum hours: April through December, daily from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.; January through March, Tuesday – Saturday 9 a.m. – 4 p.m. and Sunday 11 a.m. – 4 p.m. Closed on Thanksgiving, Christmas and New Year’s Day. Admission is free for Museum members and children aged three and under; adults $17, seniors (65+) $15, students (19+) $10, child and youth $7. For more information visit www.whalingmuseum.org.