Little Lagoda soon to set sail across Atlantic

Fifth graders work with Whaling Museum and Northeast Maritime Institute to launch

NEW BEDFORD, Mass. - Fifth grade students from William H. Taylor Elementary School in New Bedford gathered at the New Bedford Whaling Museum last week to prepare a five foot, self-steering sailboat for launch. Prior to this visit, Museum staff, assisted by Museum docent Peter Fenton, made three in-class presentations to review oceanography, geography, navigation, currents, and boat building. The Museum has been working with Educational Passages, an organization that collaboratively builds miniature boats and tracks their voyages after being launched from various points across the globe.

Designed as educational tools to teach students about the sciences of the world’s oceans, the boats are powered solely by ocean winds and currents and are capable of sailing thousands of miles. The Northeast Maritime Institute will assist with launching the Little Lagoda in the Atlantic Ocean’s Gulf Stream within one month. Once launched, the Taylor School students will be able to track their boat via a GPS transmitter on board.  The students decided how they would like to paint the boat and what objects and messages to place into a watertight well in the middle of the boat. In the past, finders of the boats have connected online with those who have launched boats. It is possible that Little Lagoda will land in a place such as Portugal, the Azores, Cabo Verde or Ireland, thereby retracing historical linkages between New Bedford and those countries.

Captions:
Photo caption for below: Fifth grade students from William H. Taylor Elementary School in New Bedford use a stencil to add the name Little Lagoda to a self-steering, GPS-enabled sailboat. The Northeast Maritime Institute will assist with launching the Little Lagoda in the Atlantic Ocean’s Gulf Stream. The project is coordinated by the New Bedford Whaling Museum and incorporates classroom learning about oceanography, geography, navigation, currents, and boat building.

Taylor School students

 

Photo caption for below: Fifth grade students from William H. Taylor Elementary School in New Bedford decorated a five-foot self-steering, GPS-enabled sailboat last week at the New Bedford Whaling Museum. The Museum has been working with Educational Passages, an organization that collaboratively builds miniature boats and tracks their voyages after being launched from various points across the globe.

Taylor students

 

For high-resolution photos: Gayle Hargreaves
Marketing Manager
ghargreaves@whalingmuseum.org
508-997-0046 ext. 139

 


About the New Bedford Whaling Museum
The New Bedford Whaling Museum is the world's most comprehensive museum devoted to the global story of human interaction with whales through time, and the history and culture of the South Coast region. The cornerstone of New Bedford Whaling National Historical Park, the Museum is located at 18 Johnny Cake Hill in the heart of the city's historic downtown. Museum hours: January through March, Tuesday – Saturday 9 a.m. – 4 p.m. and Sunday 11 a.m. – 4 p.m.; April through December, daily from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Closed on Thanksgiving, Christmas and New Year’s Day.  Admission is free for Museum members and children aged three and under; adults $16, seniors (65+) $14, students (19+) $9, child and youth $6. For more information visit www.whalingmuseum.org.