Jonathan Bourne Jr. Letterbook

1851-1853

Transcriptions by:
Sally Brownell, volunteer
New Bedford Whaling Museum Research Library

New Bedford Sept 1851
Thomas Beveridge Esqr
Dear Sir
The Bark Newton sailed Monday morning with a fair breeze, and all on board in good health and spirits. David was the last to come from his boarding house. I scolded at him for being tardy, told him it was not a good mark to be behind. Hoping your son may return to you in health and as much improved in behaviour as you could expect or even hope for.

I remain yours truly
Signd J. Bourne Jr

 

New Bedford Sept 1851
Capt Theodore Cole, Westmoreland
Dear Sir
I beleive I told you if I sold any part of the “Alex Coffin” to any one but the master I would let you have it. Having had applications for parts of ships, I have about made up my mind to sell that part I purchased of Capt Hathaway say 1/8. I paid at the rate of $6000~ with all belonging to her. Her Repairs I judge will be from six to seven more. Capt Purrington goes master, Mr Booker 1st Mate, who was four voyages for me in the B.“Roscoe” has just returned from California. I found him in the evening and never left him until I had secured him. This one eighth cost me June 18th 51 $750~~ I must have for the risk of the purchase $5~. Say $800~ for the 1/8 sale to commence at that time. She is a noble ship and will be in fine order. Please answer by mail

Very truly yours
Signd J. Bourne Jr

P.S. Sales of Whale Oil @ 46 & 47. Whale Bone 34¢. I have the Marengo’s Whale Bone on hand

[p.1]

 

New Bedford Sept 12th 1851
Capt J. R. Holt
Dear Sir
I arrived home at half past one O’clock almost melted down. Capt Crowell is the bearer of this letter who will pilot the Hunter to New Bedford.
[no signature]

New Bedford Sept 12th 1851
Mr. George A. Simmons
Dear Sir. I went to your Candle Works as I told you I should but had rather poor chance to see your Pipes. But from what you said that they were all new having been but one voyage, I will take them at 3¢ per gallon delivered at the Depot in Boston. Will want part of them in 1- to 15 days, balance in 20 to 30 Days. Please say by return of mail if I am to have them.

Very respy yours
Signd J. Bourne Jr

[p.2]

 

New Bedford Sept 13th 1851
Capt Seth Nickerson Jr
Dear Sir
A man by the name of Wm Stanley who says he came home with you last voyage from the Sandwich Islands. He applied for a Boat Steerers berth. Will you please write me what you think of him for that situation from what you know or saw of him. An early reply will greatly oblige.

Your friend
Signd J. Bourne Jr

 

New Bedford Sept 13th 1851
Dear Sir
Having been absent for a few days your letter of the 5th inst has just come to hand enclosing Letter of Administration and affidavit &C &C. I understand from your letter that it is the duty of the Administrator or his Attorney, to complete the Inventory. I therefore request you as my Attorney to go on with the Apprizes and have the Inventory completed according to Law and to take such steps in all matters appertaining to my Father’s Estate as may seem to you to be just and propper in the premises such as will protect me from the censure of those interested, from the public, and the Law. I have heard indirectly, that Joshua has since the refusal of Bourne to pay over the proceeds of Wood, made sale of more of the stock. If so you will immediately take measures to put an end to all such proceedings and call upon the purchasers for the proceeds. Please advise me if it is necessary to give notice in any public manner here of my appointment. I have received letters from Joshua of a threatning character. In this however he has mistaken his man. Bourne is here and offers to pay over the proceeds of the Wood to me. I had rather you would receive it, and pay at such time as you may [p.3] think propper the Bills which have my approval upon the face and of those which have not, you will please examine the legality of the claim.
[To] C. B. H. Fessenden Esqr

Yours truly
Signd J. Bourne Jr

 

New Bedford Sept 15th 1851
George A. Simmons Esqr
Dear Sir
Your favour of the 13th was not received until this noon. Enclosed I hand you Check on the Atlas Bank for 53 50/100 Dollars amt of my note paid by you for which please accept my thanks. In relation to the Pipes, I cannot make any better offer than I did in my former letter, thus 3¢ pr gallon for the new Pipes or those which have not been but one voyage, delivered at the Depot They will then cost me nearly as much as new chooks We are paying for new shooks made to order 90¢ pr barrel, Hoops 65¢ pr ton 5% off for cash. It only takes 25¢ worth of iron to hoop a Bbl. The labour costs us nothing as we always have a Cooper on board of our ship. This makes the cask cost us 115¢ pr Bbl, your Pipes 94 ½ ¢ R.Road freight 8¢, which added is 102 ½ ¢. Then add the labour of shooking and hoops used in bundling and I am not sure that the balance will not be in favour of the new shooks. Still will take yours at my former offer, but cannot advance for Western Pipes.

Very resp’y yours

[p.4]

 

New Bedford Sept 13 1851
Dear Sir.
Your favour of the 22nd is received and contents fully noted. I know not what course to pursue to indulge Joshua in his mad course made so and kept so by his own misconduct whereby the property belonging to others is squandered and no one benefitted but himself injured. It would seem perhaps to others a matter plain to decide, and it would to me were it not for that little helpless family, and I here frankly acknowledge that it is the most trying circumstance of my whole life, to go on and sell all the stock and furniture would be virtually turning them out of doors and Winter close upon them This I cannot do. Thus far however I will venture to order done, that is if he persists in his open opposition to the Law taking its course by a fair apprizal, and continues his reckless and disipated course. You will with the advise of Edward B. Gibbs, take all the stock except one cow the Horse or pair of Oxen and sell them at such time and manner as to you may seem best, for the interest of all concerned, and I will further recommend if his abuse or conduct to others is such as enable them or you to shut him up in the County Jail or some other place until he comes to his senses, it aught to be done and I hope it will be, it will meet with my approbation.
[To] C. B. H. Fessenden Esqr

Very resp’y yours

 

New Bedford Sept 25th 1851
Dear Sir
I was disappointed in not receiving the Blocks purchased of you by the Ship Hunter. Will you forward them by Steamer Ocean Monday? Please make the arrangement with Mr Shaw to have them come directly to the New Bedford Depot that they may come through by R.Road & oblige
[To] Mr E. S. Upham

Yours truly.

[p.5]

 

New Bedford Sept 26th 1851
George A. Simmons Esqr
1851
Dear Sir
You may send forward the lots of casks from Ship “Marengo.” Please see that the Hoops are sufficiently drove so that they will remain in the casks and not be lost.

Very truly yours.

 

New Bedford Sept 26th 1851
Capt Theodore Cole
My dear Sir. Your favour of the 10 inst was received on my return from the Eastward. I must decide about the 1/8 of Ship “Alex Coffin” and I suppose you are by this time prepared definitely to answer whether you want it or not. The Deck is in and calk? Ship will in ten days be nearly completed My regards to Mrs Cole.

Very truly yours.

 

[no date]
Respected friend. I received your letter under date of the 27th enclosing note, signed by Capt Terry. I presented it this day and received his Fathers check which I presume will be paid tomorrow have put the same to your credit on my books.
To Capt Warren N. Bourne, Falmouth

Very truly yours.

[p.6]

 

New Bedford Oct 2nd 1851
Dear Sir.
Your favour of the 29th ultimo is received ~~ I want you to finish the 6in Blocks and send them forward as soon as possible and oblige
[To] Mr E. S. Upham, Gardiner

Yours resp’y

 

New Bedford Oct 6th 1851
Gentlemen.
Your letter of the 2nd inst is received asking me to pay your Bill of $33.60 I am not aware of owing you that amount. I have your Bill of March 15th. 51 for Spikes amounting to $33.60. The Bill was paid by me March 29th ’51 discount of 4% for cash. If you wish me to send you the Bill I will do so
[To] Mess Whiton Train & Co, Boston

Yours resp’y

 

New Bedford Oct 6th 1851
George A. Simmons Esqr
Dear Sir
You may send forward the New Pipes or what is empty. Have all the short Casks been sent to the Depot?

Yours truly.

P.S. Fifty three of the Short Casks have come to hand

[p.7]

 

New Bedford Oct 7th 1851
Dear Sir
I believe those 14 in Blocks were to be common not Patent Rollers. I now wish you to amend the order by substituting 4 Patent Rollers 14 in. instead of the 6 x 14 in Common, and send them with the Small Blocks. The Box came to hand yesterday
[To] Mr E. S. Upham, Gardiner

Resp’y yours.

 

New Bedford Oct 7th 1851
Gentlemen
You will please send forward by R. Road the Fifty Bbls of Kiln Dried Flour purchased of you July 24/51 Please see that it is in good order.
[To] Mess Lyman Reed & Co. Boston

Resp’y yours.

 

New Bedford Oct 8th 1851
Mr Charles C. Leonard.
Dear Sir. I have a catalogue from Walter Greenough Auctioneer embracing a large number of chains which are to be sold Friday the 10th inst and as I am wanting one for the Ship Alexander Coffin; Would it be asking to much of you to attend the auction and purchase for me the largest upon the catalogue which is 15/16 in provided it can be had for 3¢ pr lb. Should you obtain it for that price or less. Please make your Draft on me at sight for the chain and expenses of shipping and I will duly honour it and feel very much obligated for the favour~~ Your good Lady and her uncle dined with us Monday, and left in the afternoon for Wrentham. Should you meet Mr Jonathan Hillman before the sale perhaps he can sight you [p.8]to a second hand chain the same size at a less price say 2 to 2 1/2¢ If as good as one Capt Gibbs purchased of Mr H. I would rather have it than pay 3¢ for the new.

Very truly yours.

 

New Bedford Oct 8th 1851
Dear Sir.
Will you inform me by tomorrow’s mail – If a check in favour of Jona. Bourne Jr for One Thousand Dollars drawn by the cashier of Marine Bank New Bedford on the Atlas Bank Boston dated June 17th /51 endorsed by J. Bourne Jr, payable to E. G. Peirce and endorsed by him remains in your Bank at this time The check was deposited in the Gardiner Bank, Gardiner Maine, ~~ The question arises whether said Peirce received, One Thousand Dollars or Five Hundred. He has me credited with only Five Hundred His endorsement will of course settle the question, Number of check 902
To the Cashier of the Atlas Bank, Boston

Yours truly

 

New Bedford Oct 10th 1851
My dear Sir.
I am waiting for the Short Casks to come forward. Sixty four is all that has been received. As you was to deliver them in New Bedford, I of course cannot receive them in Boston. Will you give it your earliest attention, as I am waiting for them.
[To] George A. Simmons Esqr, Boston

Yours truly

[p.9]

 

New Bedford Oct 13th 1851
Dear Sir.
When I sold you the last lot of Whale Oil, the understanding was that you should leave Note or Draft wit me as collateral. The Sale was made 9 mo 2nd 51 I have not as yet received said note or Draft. And as the oil belongd to different individuals, I am under the necessity of asking you to attend to matters without any further delay.
To Mr L. M. Wing, New York
1 Copy sent to Falmouth
1 Copy sent to Nantucket

Yours resp’y

 

New Bedford Oct 13th 1851
Amos T. Frothingham Esqr
Cashier Tremont Bank, Boston
Dear Sir.
Enclosed please find check on Atlas Bank for One Hundred & seventy six Dollars that being the amount of my Premium Note in your Bank ~~ Your will please cancel Note and enclose the same to me by mail and oblige

Yours truly

 

New Bedford Oct 1851
Mr Edward Martin
Dear Sir. Having understood from Mr Nickerson that you had a very sick child, and as the time was drawing near when the Hunter was to sail I thought it would be well for me to ask the question, If there was any doubt of your being here to go in her say by the 25th of this month. Please answer me by the return of mail and oblige

Yours resp’y

[p.10]

 

New Bedford Oct 17th 1851
George A. Simmons Esqr
Dear Sir,
Enclosed I hand you check on Atlas Bank for Ten Hundred nineteen & 17/100 Dollars the amount of your two bills of casks. You will please forward receipt for same and oblige. Also say if you have any good second hand Casks for sale.

Yours truly

 

New Bedford Oct 17th 1851
Dear Sir.
I would like to know what progress (if any) you are making with Joshua in relation to the apprisal, and if he has been selling Wood & stock of late I heard that he had. I hope you will not suffer any thing of the kind to be done if there is any possible way to prevent it lawfully. Any property purchased by any party since the apprisal I wish you to take all legal measures to compell the persons that purchased to pay to you the fair value. And perhaps it is as well or better to commence immediately as an example of this kind will no doubt prevent others from making any further trades with him.
[To] C. B. H. Fessenden Esqr, Sandwich

Very truly yours

 

New Bedford Oct 21st 1851
My dear Sir.
Your favour of the 18th & Telegraphic Dispatch were both duly received Owing to the storm yesterday I did not go down street consequently could not ascertain the feeling that the news from the Arctic produced. I find however the effect is much as I should have written if I had not consulted any one ~~ that is, Holders are disposed not to make a price. The news [p.11] is rather imperfect or in other words not relied upon as being correct in detail. Some are disposed to beleive it others are not On the whole it is beleived to be in the main correct ~~ In consultation with Mr A. R. Nye, he gave me to understand they had sold crued Whale Oil at 50¢ Still I doubt it. I think that the price for Oil & Bone will until the next mail from Sandwich Islands be unsettled. Persons holding considerable quantities will sell a part and hold a part. I have Bone. Parties have been to me for price. My price as before the news 35¢ I now ask 40¢. Rather sell half than the whole. To sum the whole matter up I think price is not materially effected, but very much unsettled as far as I can learn. In relation to Casks I cannot meet your views unless for a selection.
[No indication of recipient of this letter]

Very truly yours.

 

New Bedford Oct 22nd 1851
George A. Simmons Esqr
Dear Sir. Yours of the 21st is at hand in which you say that Oil will in your opinion rule considerable higher. Perhaps I may have been deceived in my views Had it not have been for the disastrous news. Whale Oil would have fallen a trifle as it all depends upon the next news from the balance of the fleet. I do not dispair of some of the ships doing well. But as the matter stands now it is all conjecture and no one can tell what the result will be. One thing is certain, that there is nothing to fear at present. The Manufacturers I have no doubt been doing a less profitable business than they should have done and no one to blaim but themselves. Holders ask 50¢ and rather sell small lots at that. The most I can give for short Casks. Selecting N. B. & Western good is 1$ pr Bbl deld at our Depot. If you have good ones and will sell at that you may reserve for me for the next 15 or 20 days.

Very truly yours

[p.12]

 

New Bedford Oct 24th 1851
Mr L. M. Wing
My dear Sir. Enclosed please find Leonard & Beach Note for Nineteen Hundred twenty three 27/100 Dolls which you desired me to forward.

Yours truly

 

New Bedford Oct 29th 1851
George A. Simons Esqr
Dear Sir. Your favour of the 23rd was received. You may send forward what good Casks you now have empty Mark BX. Please see that they come directly through and oblige

Yours truly.

 

New Bedford Oct 30th 1851
Mess Tufts & Hunting.
Gentlemen. Your favour of the 28th covering Invoice of Ten Oil Casks was duly received I have sent to the Depot a number of times but have not been able to find more than five guaging as follows viz 183, 166, 249, 218, 201. Will you please see that they come forward immediately and oblige

Yours resp’y

 

Mill Mess Wright Priest & Co
Send me pr R. Road 1 Bbl N. Rum say about 30 Gallons. 6 Galls of pure Cognac Brandy 6 Galls of Pure Port Wine 4 Galls of Pure Holl Gin. Please have the last three named articles put in good Iron bound Kegs & markd Ship Hunter N. Bedford. Cash price and I will send you the amt

Very truly yours

[p.13]

 

New Bedford Nov 4th 1851
My dear Sir.
Your favour of yesterday was received last evening when I returned home quite late, having attended a Whig Meeting I went with some friends to the Parker House and did not leave until 11 o’clock. Poor time to answer business letters. In fact friend Simmons I am quite at a loss what to say to you in relation to the opperations of the disastrous news from the Whaling fleet. That it is disastrous in the extreme there is no doubt. Still I am of the opinion some of the ships may have done well. We have not as yet heard any news from the Japan Sea or Okhotsh, where there has been a considerable oil taken in the two last years. And again it is not at all impossible that the ships done well the last of the season after this report. When the season when it is very boistrous in the early part it often proves and continues good weather the last part. You must make some allowance for my feeling in the matter as I am interested having five ships on the ground and beleiving two months ago that the catch would be nearly equal to the last year although I must say I had some misgivings at times. However if I had oil on hand I would keep my customers but not seek new ones. Sperm Oil will not be materially effected at present. The Holders are talking 60¢ for crued Whale doubt if any one would sell large quantities at that even if they could. In fact the holders know not what to do. ~~ Possibly small lots might be had at 56 to 58¢ I cant say exactly what they would sell for if purchasers came forward
[To] George A. Simmons Esqr, Boston

[no signature]

[p.14]

 

New Bedford Nov 6th 1851
Mr Wm Booker
Dear Sir, The ship Alex Coffin is nearly ready for sea, will sail by the middle of next week You will please come Monday next the 10th inst Don’t fail

Yours truly

 

New Bedford Nov 15th 1851
Capt Warren N Bourn
My dear sir, Enclosed I hand you two Michigan R. Road Bonds which I purchased through Mr E. L. Baker on the 7th inst. I paid Two Thousand twenty one & 89/100 Dollars. They having run since 1st October @ 8 pr ct is $16.89 and Mr Bakers Broker commission was ¼ pr cent which is $5.00 making $2021.89 in all Hoping they will come safe to hand and prove a profitable and safe investment.
No of Bond 3667
No of Bond 3666

I remain yours truly

 

New Bedford Nov 15th 1851
Mrs Weston A. Briggs
Your two letters have been received the last this day. I have no excuse to offer but negligence that is caused however by business. Have had more on hand this Fall than ever before fell to my lot. You must excuse all. Enclosed I hand you Thirty Five Dollars the sum required.

I remain yours &C.
The above letter was not sent. Turn over

[p.15]

 

New Bedford Nov 15th 1851
Mrs Weston A. Briggs
Your two letters have been received One this day. Enclosed I hand you Thirty Five Dollars, the sum requested.

Yours in haste

 

New Bedford Nov 12th 1851
George A. Simmons Esqr
Dear Sir. I shall not need any more large casks for the present. The only size I want now is 36 in and under. If you have any good casks of those sizes, please let them come forward immediately. I must close up this week. Let me hear from you by the evening mail and oblige

Yours &C

 

New Bedford Nov 15th 1851
Mrs Julia P. Kempton
Your esteemed favour of the 4th inst was not received until last evening and in compliance with your request I hasten a reply. I received a letter from Capt Tobey, written at the same time yours was in Feb. He stated that they were bound direct to the Arctic Ocean but it is not probable that they would pass other Whaling Grounds if they fell in with Whales. And as they were not reported with the fleet it is evidence to my mind they were not there. Two other ships belonging to me were not reported They were both bound to the Arctic as I feel perfectly easy about them as I do about the Lagoda. The greatest fear I have is they have been disappointed in not finding Whales as they expected to when they last wrote. I should not give myself any uneasiness concerning their safety as I have no doubt we shall hear of them very soon and perhaps with a good cargo of oil. I sincerely hope and trust that they are safe and will be returned to their friends in [p.16] health and in good time with a sufficient reward for their many privations which a Sailors life is subjected to

Very truly yours.

 

New Bedford Nov 15th 1851
Mr Richard Rowland
Dear Sir
Your letter of the 12th Inst is received. A young man shipped on board of the Bark Draco by the name of George Rowland and sailed from New Bedford 22nd of May last. The Bark was reported at Western Islands Aug 7th having taken 75 Bbls of Oil, all well would proceed on her voyage to the Indian Ocean. Was fitted for 40 to 45 months and unless she fills or some accident happens to her will most likely be absent about that time.

Very truly yours.

 

New Bedford Nov 21st 1851
George A. Simmons Esqr
Dear Sir. Yours of the 19th was duly received. Should have replied, but then expected to have been in Boston tomorrow or Monday and attended to the oil myself I think your price is rather to low. I understood from Mr Delano that you paid Knowles 125¢ which is the price I am offered for my lot here If you want the lot at the same price, you may have it, I rather you would have it than any concern in Boston. Please say by return of mail whether you take it or not. I have enclosed the Bill of Lading You will please enter the oil for me and when I come down we will arrange it.

Yours in haste.

[p.17]

 

New Bedford Nov. 1851
George A. Simmons Esqr
Dear Sir. I have by the “J. O.” Sixteen casks Sperm Oil should it be landed. Please see that it is in order. I am calculating on selling it to you ~~~ Only sixteen of your last lot of casks have come forward I wish you would send to the Depot and see that they come forward immediately as I need them and oblige

Yours truly.

 

New Bedford Nov 24th 1851
Capt Warren N. Bourne
Respected friend. Your letter of the 20th Inst came to hand requesting me to forward you Twenty Two Hundred Dollars Enclosed I hand you Robt Gibbs Note endorsed by me for Two Thousand Dollars. I presume as you have a Bank in your town you will have no difficulty in obtaining the money for it also Two Hundred Dollars in money. I also sent you by Capt Robinson Two Michigan R. Road Bonds for One Thousand Dollars each ~~ Please acknowledge the receipt of the Bonds and also of the Note and money and oblige

Yours resp’y

P.S. Please acknowledge the receipt as above by mail

 

New Bedford Nov 25th 1851
George A. Simmons Esqr
Dear Sir,
Your favour of the 22nd Inst is at hand. I intended to have come to Boston this day;, but the wind is from the east and I am not very well. I must forego the pleasure and accept your offer by asking you to settle the freight, mark the Oil B # have it truckd to the Depot and make your [p.18] Draft on me at sight for the expenses together with your Bill of Casks and I will honour the same. By the by some of the last lot of Casks did not come forward until to late for my last ship. I have them on hand. I doubt whether they will pay.

Yours in haste.

 

New Bedford Nov 25th 1851
J. Thos Stevenson Esqr, Boston
Dear Sir. Your favour of yesterday’s date is before me, enquiring if a young man by the name of George Fisher shipd and went to sea in the Ship Hunter. I find upon refering to her Shipping Articles that there is a man by that name upon them and I have some recollection of him I remember of asking him if he was Twenty one years old. He told me he was and I went to the Custom House and found his Protection gave him that age. If his Father is very desirous of his returning home he can write him at Talcahuano where I expect the ship to touch for refreshments before going on the North West Coast.

Very resp’y yours

 

New Bedford Nov 25th 1851
George A. Simmons Esqr , Boston
Dear Sir. Yours of the 26th inst was handed me this morning. Enclosed I hand you Eight Hundred one & 13/100 Dollars according to memorandum annexed. Please acknowledge the receipt and oblige.
Bill Oil Casks---------------611 ~
Dabney Cunningham--------185.60
Your Bill Cartg[?]-------------4.53
[total]---------------------$801.13

[no signature]

[p.19]

 

New Bedford Dec 3rd 1851
Leavitt Thaxter Esqr, Edgartown
Dear Sir. Your favours of the 10th and 29th ultimo have been received. I should have answered the first, but truly sir it was mislayd and I in my hurry of business had entirely forgotten it. In answer to you last I would ask, If I should advance the sum required and upon the arrival of said Bark, it should appear that Gould had deserted or had been discharged and paid off, Who is to repay this money to the owners? Having understood from good Authority that this woman has forfeited all claims upon her Husband for support I would like to hear from you again before sending the money as I am merely agent in this matter.

Very truly yours.

 

New Bedford Dec 4th 1851
Elbridge G. Peirce Esqr Gardner, Maine
My dear Sir. Your letter of the 4th ultimo came duly to hand but from the tenor of it I did not suppose it required an answer unless I had changed my mind and was ready to accept your proportion which was not the case at that time. I supposed at the time we were talking about building your price was low lower than I could have agreed with any one else. Still the prospects ahead would not warrant an opperation of that kind unless I had a superior master which I had not. Since you were here the feelings of our merchants have met with a decided change in relation to ship building for the Wright Whale Fishing. The fleet on the North West having done so poorly the last season, There will however be some half dozen Sperm Whale ships built the coming season. My last ship sailed the 23rd [p.20] ultimo. It is as you may suppose a releif to me to be somewhat at leisure after ten months constant labour and anxiety. I feel well satisfied that you did not accept my terms for building another. Still I hope the day is not far distant when I may apply to you again to build for me a sperm whaler which I most assuredly should do if I ever should build one, having given me the most perfect satisfaction in the workmanship of the Hunter. From present appearance I shall be at leisure the next year. If so shall (Providence Permitting) pay your good city a visit where I hope to find you in a flourishing condition with a plenty to do and with a liberal compensation for your services. Since writing the above a considerable news has come from the Arctic Fleet which is bad! bad! Many of the first class ships having taken nothing the whole season but we must make the best of it. New Bedford Merchants have made their money in this business, and if they lose it it will only go from whence it came. Hoping for a better report from the fleet in future and with the kindest regards to your family

I remain,
Yours truly.

 

New Bedford Dec 11th 1851
Benjm Bourne Esqr, Sandwich
Dear Sir, Your note is received. I remember having some conversation with my Father before his sickness about your account and I either saw or heard something about a letter you wrote him respecting that account. You will confer a favour on me by sending me a copy of that letter on the receipt of which you shall hear from me again

Very truly
Your obt servt

[p.21]

 

New Bedford Dec 17th 1851
Dear Sir
Your letter of the 10th Inst just come to hand enquiring abut Ship Stephania. She was reported July 26/51 Bhering’s Straits Arctic Ocean with two Whales, all well. Upon examination of the Shipping Papers I find the name of Warren W. Thomas, that being the only person by the name of Thomas on the Papers.
[To] Mr Almon[?] Thomas, Plattsburgh New York

Yours resp’y

 

New Bedford Dec 18th 1851
Mess Williams & Barnes, New London
Gentlemen,
Your letter of the 10th inst is received making further enquiries relative to Capt Finch’s Draft for $30.92. I have not been able to get a settlement with Capt Finch, he having as yet failed to produce satisfactory accounts against the owners sufficient to cover the amount of Drafts paid I showed this Draft to him but he was unable at the time to tell what the Draft was given for. Did not seem to recollect any thing about it. I have enclosed the Draft that you may not lose sight of it. I have taken a memorandum of it and will charge it to him, and will deduct it from his account should there be that amount due him on settlement and will pay it when satisfied the proceeds was used for my ship.

Very truly yours

[p.22]

 

New Bedford Dec 18th 1851
Capt Warren N. Bourne
Respected friend. I was in the Union Mutual Insurance Office the other day looking over the Book and saw that many of the owners of the good Ship Phocion had recently obtained Insurance on Oil on board. You are no doubt aware that you have quite an interest which is insurable, and the Ship is old. Still I have no doubt good for the voyage. Sometimes we think it worth while to secure it by Insurance. If you have any disposition to do so I will attend to it for you, and request the Secretary to send the note and Policy to you.

Very truly yours

 

New Bedford Dec 19th 1851
Capt John Cole
My dear sir. Annexed I hand you your account amounting to Sixteen Hundred Eight and 71/100 Dollars – As I told you when here that I should have use for all my spare funds. I hope you will give the matter your earliest attention as I am wanting money.

Very truly yours,

 

New Bedford Dec 22nd 1851
Mess Tufts & Hunting, Boston
Gentlemen
You will confer a favour by stating the date of the Bill and guage of cask which you say contained Water instead of Whale Oil, and oblige

Very truly yours,

[p.23]

 

New Bedford Dec 26th 1851
Mess Randall H. Greene & Sons
Gentlemen
I am holding a fine lot of Polar Bone. Would like to know what price can be obtained in your market, say Fifteen Thousand pounds all rebundled and all entirely sound. Please let me hear from you and oblige

Your friend,

 

New Bedford Dec 26th 1851
Mrs Frances Willard
Madam
Your favour of the 21st has just come to hand saying that you are the mother of John D Willard, who sailed from New Bedford as 2nd officer of Ship Lagoda and that you have Mr Willards letter requesting you to draw his share of Oil sent home from Western Islands. I am as you are probably aware Agent and part owner of the ship and have no orders from Mr Willard myself ~ And as you are a stranger to me it will be necessary for you to enclose his letter to me before I should be justified as Agent for the owners to pay over any money belonging to him. Again Mr Willard received a hundred and fifty dollars in cash of me before he sailed which would leave a balance due from him after deducting his share of oil sent home ~ I received a letter from Capt Tobey of the “Lagoda” dated Sandwich Islands Oct 14/51 saying that the crew and officers were in general health. They had not been succesful on the North West had only taken one Whale was very fortunate on their passage to the North West and would ship what oil they had home by the Ship Fanny say 300 Bbls Sperm and 500 Whale.

[no signature]

[p.24]

 

New Bedford Dec 30th 1851
Friend Cole
Your esteemed favour of the 29th came to hand this morning. The time named by you will answer my purpose for the payment of the balance of your account say by the 20th of January. I understood accidently that Elisha W. had been to New Bedford with his family. They did not call at my house, the reason I suppose, was in one of his Wild Schemes. He called on me for aid, I refused which I should do again under similar circumstances. He left me rather abruptly which did not trouble me I understood he was to leave soon for Calafornia with his family if he has not already. ~~ I know what I should do but have no advise to give in this case of course. Please not mention that I have said any thing about the matter as I should not, if you had not written me. My family are all at home and are very well except Mrs B. who is in usual health.

Yours truly

P.S. I understand Capt Shockley has arrived in town and is looking well and reports say that only two men have left the ship. There is a sort of rumor that the Washington was doing something but I have not been able to see Capt Maxfield of the Arabella who came this morning also He I understand may tell me more definitely

[p.25]

 

New Bedford Jan 3rd 1851 [52?]
George A. Simmons Esqr, Boston
Dear Sir
Yours of the 1st inst came duly to hand and I have gathered what information I could in relation to Oils.
Whale and Sperm Oil on hand in the U. States Jan 1st 1852 in the hands of Speculators and Importers.

Sperm

New Bedford-----------------7950
Fairhaven---------------------1850
Mattapoisett--------------------800
Westport----------------------3900
Nantucket---------------------5200
N.York (Newport Cargo)-----1100
New London-------------------600
[total]------------------------21400

Whale

New Bedford}---------24250
Fairhaven}
Vinyard-----------------1300
Nantucket---------------2200
All other places--------13650
[total]------------------41400

 

This account I got from Wm Philips Esqr and I suppose is in the main correct. Now it is difficult to tell what the ships remaining in the Arctic and Okhotsk will do the latter part of the season. It is presumed they will make a decidedly better average than those which have arrived at the Islands. And as yet no letters from many of them that have come in have been received consequently we are not able to ascertain whether they intend to ship their oil home or not. We know that some of them are shipping while others are not. But when letters are not at hand we cannot tell, neither can we judge of those that are to come in. My own opinion is that the ships that come in late will not as a general thing ship their oil home. If I was in the Manufacturing business with a stock as large as yours, my sales would be based upon a price for crude Whale varying from 56 to 63¢. For the present season no doubt there will be brought into use every article that art can invent for burning purposes. It is impossible at present to tell what the imports will be for the year. I can only say what my impressions have been without going into [p.26] figures which has been about a Hundred Thousand Bbls.

Yours truly,

 

New Bedford, Jan’y 6th 1852
Capt John R. Holt
Dear Sir. Two months and more have elapsed since you sailed and still the world goes on about as usual with the exception that Whale Oil that desirable article brings a much higher price than at any time since I have been engaged in the business say 58 to 60¢ pr gallon crude Bone 45 to 50¢ owing to the almost entire failure of the Arctic Whalers this season which was occasioned by the severity of the preceeding winter and the lateness of the breaking up of the Ice in those seas together with a very boistrous summer. In fact the most of the fleet have done very poorly. Those that have taken much Oil are a few ships that whaled in the Okhotsk seas and those that stayed very late in the Arctic This failure brings other difficulties with it. As soon as the ships arrive into the Sandwich Islands, the Devil is to pay with the crew and officers. Consequently upon that follows Drafts the worst of all evils in this business. Still the masters do not appear to be at all discouraged with the prospects of the coming season. All agree with the exception of Capt Shockley of Wm Hamilton (he having come home) that the prospects are good the next season ~ . Now sir, let me renew my wishes to you which were well understood before you left. That you keep the Hunter entirely clear from the Sandwich Islands unless it is a case of necessity I enclose a letter to George Fisher one of your hands which comes from his father and I presume calls loudly upon him to return home I beleive he is under age perhaps a year less than 21 when he sailed, and I rather take the responsibility of his minority than lose his services after paying 75$ for him However I would not give him the letter until you are ready to sail or not until you are clear from Port. I saw James Thomas the 2nd inst was well and spoke of you. Both expressed a wish to hear from you Saw William’s mother (Mrs Blossom[?]) a few days since. She was well. In fact amoung your friends here I beleive there has been no changes. I go after dinner to help bury one of the best men that ever lived a noble specimen of your profession (a sailor) and a most estimable citizen -------[p.27] Capt Matthew Luce. He died Saturday evening. Had been sick about 70 Days I am frank to acknowledge that I know no other man to make good his place. He was an honest man and has gone to reap the reward of a well spent life. “A Coffiin” sailed the 13th November. “Marengo” 23 Nov Not a word from them since they sailed Hope to hear a good report from all of you when I do hear. If you keep clear of the Sandwich Islands I am in hopes you will all of you get along without drawing I shall expect a long letter from you at Talcahuana giving me all the good qualities of the Hunter and telling me what alterations I must make if I build another which I cannot do until some of the last get Oil I have sent a number of packages of Papers directed to all the ships I have at sea with liberty for any of the masters to open that get them first. Hope you will get your share Please make my regards to Mrs. Holt. Tell her I shall expect to hear of her being one of the best of sailors. Would not recommend her going in the Boats this voyage but wait until the next I find upon examination that James Bush’s Bills come much higher than I expected amount’g to $160~ I hope you will not let the fellow run away. I hope you will have a sharp look out for your crew ad not let them run away until the ship is full. I must now close with my best regards to your officers and to your good wife with a large share to yourself

I remain
Yours truly

 

New Bedford Jan’y 8th 1852
Mess Randall C. Greene & Sons, New York
Gents
Your favour of the 6th inst came to hand last evening to late for me to answer. I had hoped to get 47¢ for my Bone, that would only net me about 46¢ here Should you obtain that offer or near it please communicate.

Yours truly

[p.28]

 

New Bedford Jany 13th 1852
Edw C. Fisher Esqr, Richmond
Dear Sir. Your letter of the 6th is received and contents fully noted. The Ship Hunter is entirely new built for me expressly for the Whaling Business. Is 452 Tons will carry in Oil about 3500 Bbls. Is of a beautiful model and strong and substantial in every particular. Is mand with 32 men all told. Fitted for a 36 months voyage if not fortunate enough to obtain a cargo earlier. She is to cruise in the North Pacific Ocean, will obtain her recruits such as vegetables fresh meals &c &c at the Sandwich Islands, New Zealand or on the coast. The Whaling business differs from other commercial business. It is pursued somewhat upon the mutual principal. The amount paid the seaman depend upon the success of the voyage, each person on board drawing such a portion of the net proceeds of the catchings upon the final settlement of the voyage. Their proportion is fixed at the time they sign the Shipping Articles. If a man deserts he forfeits all his interest that he may have. It is never expected that a green hand will make any considerable sum more than to pay his amount of outfits, necessary expences during the voyage, and infits when he comes home and perhaps one or two hundred Dollars in addition. These voyages are as a general thing very healthy. As few Deaths occur according to the number engaged in it as in any other calling. The ship is strong mand and will be a great portion of the time cruising in good weather. I fear you are rather prejudiced against this particular business. I can assure you sir that many of our wealthiest citizens have pursued this for years. Commenced in the forecastle and advanced voyage after voyage until they have obtained a competency. In fact it is about the only business that is pursued in New Bedford, that of the Whale Fishery. I was personally acquainted with more of the Hunters crew than any other ship of mine that has sailed this year. She being new berths were sought after Some prefered her from the Captain’s taking his wife with him in the ship. He intends to continue in the ship during the whole voyage This is a matter worth considering although your son goes out as a [p.29] foremast hand living in the fore-castle. Still Mrs Holt would be as ready to administer to his wants if sick as if he was in the cabin Talcahuana is a Chilian port on the Pacific. Should the Hunter touch there (and Capt Holt thought he should when he sailed the passage if he made it direct would be about 90 to 100 days. Still he would cruise along as the chances are in favour of taking Oil making the passage. Should you desire to write your son, any letter sent me next Spring & summer, I will forward by our ships going to the same whaling ground. The chances are that he will obtain one out of every three sent. George made a Draft on me before he left for $64.55 to pay for his outfits which I have paid. I have sent you the heading of the Shipping Articles showing you the contract signed by every person on board of the Hunter (captains wife excepted) which will give you some idea of the regulations on board and in port, and the Whalemans Shipping List published in our city showing the extent of this business in all parts of the country I beleive sir you have doing business in your city a Mr Allen who went from New Bedford and can probably give you more information about the business than I can by writing. The chances to find a vessel at Talcahuana bound to the U. States should the Hunter touch there are uncertain and I should much rather have a son of mine continue on board of any Whale Ship than be left at such a port as Talcahuana The influence would be any thing but good with all classes especially the young I am very sorry that George should have taken such a course while it is so much against your wishes for him to follow the sea. Yet I think very likely this voyage may prove an advantage to him as it may learn him the value of a good home. I hope and trust such may be the result and that he may be spared to return to you again in health with the full determination never to play truant again.

Very resp’y yours [con’t next page]

P.S. You will notice that there has been a number of ships lost in the whaling business the past year, a greater number than at any previous season, owing to the great abundance of Ice and bad weather. But very few lives lost

[p.30]

 

New Bedford Jan’y 13th 1852
Mrs Frances Willard
Your esteemed favour is received requesting me to forward you Fifty Dollars on your son’s account and charge the same to him. Enclosed please find Fifty Dollars which I hope you will receive in due time. In your letter to me you seemed to think I was fearful of your honesty. If you will read my letter again I beleive you will come to a different conclusion as no expression of that kind is in it. Nor can any one put such a construction upon it. You will readily perceive that when we do business for others without their written order we are Liable in case there should be any dispute and when we make contracts or charges we know not who is to settle them as life is always uncertain. The Lagoda sailed from Sandwich Islands Oct 25th on a cruise.

Very resp’y yours.

 

New Bedford Jan’y 14th 1852
Friend Cole
Your esteemed favour of the 12th inst covering check on Suffolk Bank Boston for One Thousand Dollars, came duly to hand. I have placed the same to your credit. There has been no late report from the Roscoe, Washington had 600 Bbls the 14th of July, 40 of it Sperm. A subsequent report gives her 700 Bbls no date. I am in hopes she will do something. Shall expect to hear from her soon.

Very truly yours.

[p.31]

 

New Bedford Jan’y 14th 1852
Mess Dana Farrar & Hyde, Boston
Gentlemen. Your letter is received. ~~ Our ships are all out that are going this winter. I doubt if the article of Raisins can be sold here at present for anything like their value ~~ Next summer perhaps they would command a fair price in our market although we always prefer Drd Apples, they being tart, have a tendency to prevent Scurvy which our crews are liable to during a long voyage.

Very resp’y yours.

 

New Bedford Jany 19th 1852
George B. Ellis Esqr, Monument, Sandwich
Dear Sir.
Your letter of the 27th ultimo is received saying that you have a demand against my Fathers Estate All Legal demands against his estate will be settled. The Farm will be sold at Auction, I presume in the Spring. After which the out-standing debts will be paid

Very truly yours.

 

Ship Brunswick & Os
To. Jonathan Bourne Jr Dr
1851
Sept 17
For 1 Anchor 1718# @ 5 ½ ¢--------------94.49
Anchor Interest to 52 1 mo 19----------------1.91
[total]--------------------------------------$96.40

New Bedford Jan’y 19th 1852
Abner R. Tucker Esqr, Dartmouth
Dear Sir ~
I am now closing up my years business together with all ship accounts. You will confer a favour by settling the annexed Bill

Yours truly.

[p.32]

 

New Bedford Jan’y 28th 1852
Capt S. Hawes, Newport R.I
Dear Sir. Yours of the 26th inst is received. It will be convenient to pay your note, Tuesday or Friday of any week by giving me notice the day previous . By sending the note to Capt B. Clark and letting him collect the amount due and obtain a check on Boston. If you have a Bank in your Town it will answer the same purpose as cash. Thereby saving the trouble and expense of coming down.

Yours resp’y

 

New Bedford Jan’y 28th 1852
Friend Theodore.
It having been some time since I wrote you perhaps a line will not come amiss. In the first place I will begin with the “A. Coffin”. She sailed Nov 13th 1851, I beleive in good order for a North West voyage, well officered and mand. I obtained Insurance for you for 4250 $. This amount you will notice by the enclosed Account does not cover. The Marengo sailed Nov 23/51 also in good order well mand with 35 Men and well officered. Capt Watson late of the “Newton” going mate. I obtained Insurance for 5000 $ This will not cover. I have not made up her account as the Whale Bone is still on hand. She will cost very high being a large Ship, and is now as good as any thing in the business. If you want more Insurance obtained, please say so by letter and I will attend to it immediately. You will oblige by sending me One Thousand Dollars on a/c of the “A. Coffin”

Yours very truly

[p.33]

 

New Bedford Jan’y 29th 1852
Capt John Cole, Walpole
Dear Sir. Your two letters first containing order on I. Howland Jr & Co for Four Hundred Dollars latter containing certificate of Deposit for Two Hundred Dollars, have both come to hand and the amount placed to your credit. Sperm Oil, Whale Oil & Bone very Dull.

Yours truly

 

New Bedford Feb 2nd 1852
Mr. E. G. Peirce, Gardiner
Dear Sir. Your esteemed favour of the 31st Dec. was duly received. I should have replyd at an earlier date, but have just closed the “Hunters” a/c this day. The whole cost Ship, outfits advances, due the 1st day of Nov. last amounts to $47,087.66 That of the “Cornelius Howland” whole ship, outfits, advances, &c &c made due the day she sailed $46~~ “Thomas Nye” $48,128 ~~ and I understood that Messrs Tucker & Co’s ship, the “Alice Mendall” say whole amount is between 43 & 44000$ Also the two ships built by Drummond for Thornton and Mess Wood & Nye the whole cost each averages between 43 & 44000$ I must acknowledge that the “Hunter” cost more by 3000$ than I expected. I have managed according to my best understanding in fitting the ship without depriving her of any Articles which I beleived would be necessary or useful during the voyage The Atlantic belonging to Hathaway & Luce Laying opposite when you was here built by Mr Cannon sailed for something less than 40,000$ which I consider less than either of the others taking all things into consideration I had hoped when you was here that the “Hunter” would have fallen short of the “Cornelius Howland” and why I was induced to beleive it then was in this way. I added up what Bills had been charged on the ledger and formed as near as I could an estimate and from that estimate and from that estimate I beleived the Hunter would cost less [p.34] that the “C. H.” but there was an omission of Fish & Robinson’s Bill and expenses on the bill of Plank charged to you in your account but was not charged to the ship as paid you. This made her account so much more say 1400$ This amount you see would have brought her cost less that the “C.H.” Thus stands the whole matter. ~~~~ Now Sir I feel to regret that you should have lost by the opperation but do not feel that I am at all to blaim. If the feelings of the owners of the “Hunter” as well as those of all other ships had not changed from high expectations to a more moderate and rational view of prospects as they now exist I could have a better heart to urge them to pay more. But the ship having so far exceeded my expectations I cannot in justice to my own sense of right say one word This much I will say. If she makes a good voyage I will again lay the matter before them and urge the matter in your favour. And I will agree further providing she makes a good voyage I will pay my proportion of the Three Hundred Dollars whether they do or not. To obligate them I cannot. Should be very happy to hear from you at any time when you are at leisure.

Very truly yours,

 

New Bedford Feb 4th 1852
Friend Cole
Your esteemed favour of the 2nd Inst came to hand this day enclosing note signd by B. B. Howard for Nine Hundred Fifty One & 34/100 Dollars and Fifty Dollars in cash all of which is placd to your credit on “A.Coffin’s” a/c. I am not yet decided to use the Note. If I do not will keep it until I see you. The Marengo’s Repairs Outfits Advances Slops &c &c amounts to $38,267 57/100 Dollars. This amount may seem large to you but not larger than it does to me. The Advances are very high. The Mate 700$ Second Mate 200$ and so on advancing every man through the whole crew except one man I will make the enquiry of Mr Howard in regards to the paymts on the “Cowpers” Oil

Very truly yours

[p.35]

 

New Bedford Feb 5th 1852
Capt Warren N. Bourne
My dear Sir. Having occasion to refer to your Account Book of last voyage in “Stephania” I could not find it and my young man thinks you took it home ~~ ~~ If so you will oblige me by sending it to me for a few days and I will return it again to you. Also the account as rendered to you of last voyage. Having leisure at this time I would like to review it. Please send them by Capt Robinson and oblige

Yours truly

 

New Bedford Feb 6th 1852
Mr E. G. Peirce, Gardiner
Dear Sir. ~Supposing you would like to hear how the “Hunter” behaved on her passage to “St. Vincent”. I received a letter from Capt Holt this morning. You being somewhat acquainted with Capt Holt, his manner of speech &c I will copy the letter verbatim

[in pencil:] See Capt Holts Letter
You will remember friend Peirce in speaking of the “Hunter” I feared she was not quite long enough on the floor Timbers. This is the difficulty ~~ It will remedy this evil partly when she gets Water Soakd but not fully. Will always be tender which is rather an objection for a Whaler. But still there is an advantage in it. She will not wear Sails & Rigging hard.

Yours truly

[p.36]

 

New Bedford Feb 6th 1852
George A. Simmons Esqr, Boston
Dear Sir. There being an enquiry for some of the “Marengo’s” Whale Oil which remains unsold in the owners hands, I was requested by one of my friends to ascertain how the Oil worked. You will confer a favour by replying by tomorrows Mail with your opinion of the quality of the Oil, how it worked and bleached and what proportion you found sour.

Very truly yours.

 

New Bedford Feb 7 1852
Friend Wing
Enclosed I hand you your account made up to 1 Mo 1st 52 showing your indebtedness to be Seven Hundred Five and 89/100 Dollars. By remitting the amount with the interest you will greatly oblige me as my wants in the Money line just at this time are large

Very truly yours

 

New Bedford Feb 9th 1852
George A. Simmons Esqr, Boston
Dear Sir. The Whale Oil that I made the enquiry about Saturday has been sold for 57¢ no selection. sale not made public. I presume from what I learn that the Whale Oil is all held at 60¢ and cannot at this time be bought at any thing less.

Very truly yours.

[p.37]

 

New Bedford Feb 26th 1852
Mrs. Weston A. Briggs
Your letter of the 18th inst is received. Enclosed I hand you Twenty Five Dollars which I have charged to your husbands account The last news from the Washington was July 14th 1851. I saw Capt Maxfield who was on board of her He says Capt Palmer would not go to the Sandwich Islands unless he obtained 1800 Bbls that season and it is not very probable he did. Consequently has not been reported in at the Islands. We may not hear from the ship in some time to come although I think she is safe

Yours resp’y

 

New Bedford Feb 27th 1852
E. G. Peirce Esqr, Gardiner
Dear Sir. In conversation with some gentlemen relative to the Pilot Boat you are building, they stated that you did not make the model but that it was made by a gentleman in New York. I understood from you, that it was somewhat copied from the celebrated Yacht “America”, but that you and George made it with your own hands. I would like to be corrected if I am mistakened~~ Is it to late in the season to talk about a cheap ship similar to the one we talked of last fall?

Yours truly

 

New Bedford March 16th 1852
L. N. Wing [West Falmouth]
Dear Sir. Your letter of the 15th inst is received I am sorry it is not convenient for you to pay the note due on the 22nd inst as I had use for the money and must now make other arrangements. Enclosed I hand you note for Six Hundred & Ninety seven Dollars due 4/4/52 extending the time of payment 10 @ 13 Days. You will please sign it and return it to me and I will forward the other

Yours truly

[p.38]

 

New Bedford March 19th 1852
C. B H. Fessenden Esqr
Dear Sir. When I left you and Mr Nye I supposed I was to hear from you in the early part of the week Would like to learn what the result of Mr Nye’s visits if he has made it and if Joshua has been down to the village since I left &c &c ~~ This matter must be brought to a close. I am very anxious to leave for the West by the first of June to be absent some two months ~~ Must come to Sandwich soon and if nothing is done shall resign as Administrator in Nye’s favour.

Very truly yours.

[In pencil] Sandwich, Massachusetts

 

New Bedford March 20th 1852
My dear Sir.
Your favour of the 19th is received, enclosing Prospectus for the “Old Bay State”. I question if many subscribers can be obtained here, however I will try.
To. George Morey Esqr, Boston

Yours truly

 

New Bedford March 22nd 1852
L. M Wing
Dear Sir. Your letter of the 19th was duly received enclosing your note for Six Hundred & Ninety Seven Dollars. Enclosed please find your note given up in exchange.
[In pencil] West Falmouth, Mass

Yours truly

[p.39]

 

New Bedford April 12th 1852
Mess Slate Gardner & Co, New York
Gentlemen
I beleive that you were once owners of the Ship “Fanny” formerly of N. York and late of Sag Harbour now owned by a company at Nantucket. Said Ship arrived at our port Saturday night from Honolulu with cargo of Oil & Bone and is I understand for sale. Will you give me such information in regard to the materials used for her building If there was any Locust Live Oak or Cedar used in her frame and what repairs was made upon her while owned by you I would like to know your opinion of the ship. This may be presuming to much but having great confidence in your Mr Slate’s judgement in regard to ships and knowing something of the thorough manner in which he examines vessels, I am the more anxious (as he was probably the purchaser) By giving me the above information (if in your possession) you will confer a favour which at any time would give me pleasure to reciprocate

Very truly yours

 

New Bedford April 16th 1852
Dear Sir
I am anxious to learn something about the Ship “Fanny”. She was built in New York some twenty five or thirty years ago. What I wish more particularly to know is if her frame or timbers are Live Oak the whole or any part of them. If you will take a little trouble about it you can by enquiring find out who built the ship who owned her and ascertain from them. I am loth to trouble you in this matter but have written Slate Gardner & Co some days since (they owned the ship while she was employd in the Whaling Business from Sag Harbour) but they have not replyd and there are no other parties with whom I am sufficiently acquainted with to enquire of. Please keep this matter a secret.
[To] Charles C. Leonard Esqr, New York

Yours truly

 

[p.40]

 

New Bedford April 17th 1852
C. B. H. Fessenden Esqr, Sandwich
Dear Sir. Please inform me if the petition for permition to sell has ever been granted by the Judge of Probate Also how matters stand and if I must come to Sandwich in order to advertise the sale. Let me be favoured with an early reply & oblige

Yours truly

P.S. Please say how the Trout Fishing is this Spring as I have a desire to try my hand at that sport.

 

New Bedford April 19th 1852
A. G. Peirce Esqr, Gardiner, Maine
Dear Sir
Your esteemed favour of the 29th of Feb’y was duly received where you say you could build a ship and get her off by September provided you could get the bottom while the snow remained. I have through the Winter & Spring thus far endeavourd to control my feelings in relation to Ship Building for this present year and thus far have accomplishd. But I am nearly enclined to do some thinking by way of contract to have a ship ready by the first of May 1853. This would give me time to pick up many of the articles necessary for a ship at a less price than what was paid for the “Hunters” And no doubt it would the builder also by way of taking the advantage of purchasing such materials as he would want when they come down the river provided he had made his contract ahead and knew what he wanted. Since I talked with you it has occured to me that one half of the fastening through the Kelson and Keel would answer to be of Iron and good for thirty years and perhaps in many more places whereby a considerable saving of expense could be made. You see my mind runs upon Ship building as usual but have not come to any definite conclusion yet. If it was known however that I had any idea of building a ship, I should be overun with applicants for the contract. I happened [p.41] to fall in with Mr Grant in Boston He expressed a strong desire that I should build after his was launched perhaps he would give you a good chance in his yard if we could make a bargain. These matters should all be settled first however Their yard is a better place than where the “Hunter” was built inasmuch as the old building upon it is useful in stormy weather I would like very well to hear from you also from my old friend Mr Ohaney [?], with whom I used to have some friendly talk. If we should not agree upon terms to build the correspondence may not be of any injury to either of us at what season of the year can Spruce & Norway Plank Timber & Knees be obtained to the best advantage for the purchaser.

Yours truly

 

New Bedford April 22nd 1852
Capt Charles P. Worth
Respected friend
I received your letter of the 19th of April 1851 for 859 $ You seem to express a good deal of feeling in being compeld to make this Draft. Capt Worth? I expect to answer all necessary Drafts from my Masters without attaching any blaim to them. You was also reported at Tombez the 20th of November with 650 Bbls ~~ I regret exceedingly that hard fortune should have followed you during this voyage as I have no doubt you have strove hard to obtain Oil - But we can not always accomplish our object. I hope you will be more fortunate during the cruise that you are now on. If at any time you should judge propper to try a cruise right whaling you will remember our conversation before you sailed giving you full liberty to do so when in your judgement it was for the interest of those conserned I sincererly hope you will be fortunate enough to obtain 1500 Bbls of Sperm Oil, In that case you will make a good voyage, provided it is accomplished in four years. If you do not however I shall beleive all will be done that can be on your part as I have no doubt it has been thus far. The last news I had from your friends at Nantucket they were well. You must keep your ship well recruited and when it is not convenient to sell Oil at a good price, you can draw on me, and your Draft will be honoured [p.42] I think however it is well to sell Oil when you can get within 10 or 20¢ for gallon of what it is bringing at home, and I suppose you can always ascertain within a very few weeks the prices at home. Sperm Oil is now selling at 125¢ Whale Oil 73¢ Whale Bone 50¢. You see that Whale Oil is very high in consequence of the failure of the fleet on the North West Coast last season. This will not continue long if the fleet do better next season. I have no doubt but the price will advance on Sperm Oil somewhat possibly to 120 or 135¢ I suppose you always sell body on the coast and at your guages which is something in your favour I regretted you did not ship home your Sperm Oil when you first got round by the Ship “Mary Ann” Capt Taber, as the interest would have more than paid the freight. Should you have a chance to sell Body Oil for money at a high price any time during the voyage, you must act your own pleasure in doing so and either send home the money or bring it home when you come only see that you do it safely with those you trade with as I expect there are many dishonest persons in all those ports on the coast. You will have the goodness to write me whenever you have an opportunity and inform me of the condition of your Ship Officers your own health &c &c. You must not expect many letters from me as it is not my practice having a great many vessels it would take up considerable time and I am not particularly fond of writing either but will write you as many as I do to any master I have. It is not because I have any feeling in relation to your hard luck. This is not the case would write the oftener on that account. Please say to Mr Smith (1st Mate) that I have this day seen his father was in good health desired me to say that his friends were in usual health. Hoping this will reach you speedily and find you in health & spirits having just come from a successful cruise. I will now bid you farewell for the present

Yours truly

[p.43]

 

New Bedford April 29th 1852
Mess Sturtevant & Edwards, Boston
Gentlemen. I herewith send you samples of 36 Casks Whale Oil. If the Oil is, or is not satisfactory you will say so by return of mail and keep the sample phials until the casks come to hand, and make the comparison, and then please return the phials to me, as I found them a more expensive purchase than I anticipated, and they will answer to use again.

Yours very truly,

 

New Bedford May 1st 1852
Mess Sturtevant & Edwards, Boston
Gentlemen. Annexed I hand you Bill of Thirty Six casks Whale Oil amounting to Forty Eight Hundred Eighteen & 25/100 Dollars. The Oil will come forward Monday, I have changed two casks say 32 & 33. The latter was the dark one, the other was a poor cask. The two substituted in their stead are as good as any Oil in the lot. You can examine them yourselves. You will please send me your two notes at five & six months. Hoping the Oil will prove satisfactory, I remain

Yours truly

[p.44]

 

New Bedford May 3rd 1852
E.G. Peirce Esqr, Gardiner, Maine
Dear Sir. Your favour of the 24th is received in which you ask me to state what kind of a ship I want (if any) and how fastened and what kind of materials to be used for her building. The model of the ship I should want similar to the “Hunter” with longer floor timbers so as to give a shorter turn in the bilge which will make the ship a little stiffer. Length 115 feet. Width in proportion to length. Depth 16 feet 3 in with quarter deck for cabin purposes. Floor hard wood. Main body of the ship hack principally some oak forward and aft. Ceiled throughout with spruce or Norway pine. Rail and Plankshere southern pine, oak round the bows, Stantions hack some oak against the rigging and gangway. Monkey rail all round, transoms hack. Apron & stem oak Knight heads oak. Deck frame spruce and norway except in hatchways which will require hard pine or hack. Lower deck Knees hack, upper deck spruce. Hack standing knees. Stern post & rudder stock oak deck spruce. Hack standing knees. Stern post & rudder stock oak Bottom plank hard wood all above norway except upper wale hard pine or oak. Wood ends copper fastened, bottom copper fastened, top iron & bungees, bullwarks all sound copper. Lower deck spruce or norway. Upper deck white pine both iron fastened. Fastening through the Keel yellow metal & iron half each through stern post & stern Y. Metal. No metal bolts over 11/.8 in. Windlass oak with patent geer, iron whelps and iron head patent. Blocks Batermans patent which are all iron shapd. Dead Eyes Lignumvitae. Ship finished about the deck similar to the Hunter also between deck except the Iron Knees which I shall waive shall want side lights and bow lights & stern lights furnished by the builder. Iron work for spars complete which can be furnished there if you prefer. In fact I have not time to specify all now, but want such a ship as I talked about last fall. Completely finished for the business, sheathd & coppered on the stocks owners to furnish sheathing metal, sheathing & coppering nails sheathing paper boat geer & no other extras ~ over [p.45] You may let me hear from you soon as I talk of going West early in June and if I do should want to settle upon terms before I leave and should wish to see you personally.

Yours truly,

 

New Bedford May 5th 1852
Mess Sturtevant & Edwards, Boston
Gentlemen. I have sent your 36 casks Whale Oil to Depot this day markd S x E with white paint Hoping it will arrive safely I remain

Yours truly
J. Bourne Jr
Pr Denham

 

New Bedford May 5th 1852
Capt Warren N. Bourne
My dear Sir. I regret exceedingly that I was absent when you calld yesterday. Should liked to have seen you. Enclosed please find Three Hundred Dollars $300 ~~ . The sum I understood you wanted also enclosed Account Current and Interest a/c showing balance due you Jan’y 1st 1852 of Fifty Five Hundred Seventy Five & 93/100 Dollars I suppose you have seen the various reports from the “Roscoe” I beleive however that the report of 700 Bbls is true. Rather small business. Still if she gets 500 more it will be a fair business. These high prices make a wonderful difference in small quantities. The “Stephania” had done poorly. I hope however the next season may prove better.

Yours &c

[p.46]

 

New Bedford May 11th 1852
Mess Sturtevant & Edwards, Boston
Gentlemen. Your two notes for Forty Nine Hundred Fifty Three & 15/100 Dollars in payment for bill Whale Oil dated May 1st 52 came safely to hand this morning and were placed to your credit Whale Oil is selling readily at 75¢ straight through.

Very truly yours,

 

New Bedford May 18th 1852
John Tyler Esqr, Boston
Dear Sir. Enclosed please find check on Atlas Bank for Three Hundred Thirty Six & 57/100 Dollars which amount covers your Bill of Chains Please receipt Bill and return it by mail and oblige

Yours truly

 

New Bedford May 26th 1852
C. B. H. Fessenden Esqr
Dear Sir,
I find on refering to my Mortgage that my Father’s Homestead Farm lying on the westerly side of Monument river contains about Twenty three acres of cleared land including two orchards and several loads of fresh meadow also one wood lot of about fourteen acres also one undevided half of a tract of wood land containing two hundred acres, Also such personal property as there may be remaining on said farm. Would it not be well to say in the advertisement that other undevided lots will be offered unless the necessary amount is raised from the above to cover the sum mentioned in the licence. You must say as much in relation to the location and quality of the land as you think the circumstances require

Very truly yours

[p.47]

 

New Bedford June 1st 1852
Mrs. Weston A. Briggs
Your letter is received asking me to send you twenty five dollars. Enclosed please find the amt asked for I shall cause to be insured on Mr Briggs account One thousand dollars beleiving it will meet with your husbands approbation

Very respy yours

 

New Bedford June 1st 1852
C. C. Blauvelt Jr
Dear Sir. Your letter of yesterday is received The Ship Marengo was at Talcahuana in Feby all well ~~ The Captain’s wife received letters from her husband also the chief mate but as yet none has come to hand for me. The letter mentioned that every thing was going on well on board I may yet receive letters by other conveyance hope I may. You may now commence writing to your Son as often as one in two weeks and I will forward them by ships bound to those seas whaling
[In pencil] Paterson, N.J.

Very truly yours

 

New Bedford June 7th 1852
C. B. H. Fessenden Esqr
Dear Sir. I see in the advertisement of my father’s homestead you say other wood lots may be offered It should say other meadow land or lots. I am now quite unwell and confined to my house Hope I shall be able to be at the sale. If not it will be necessary to postpone it Will write you again if I dont come

Yours truly

[p.48]

 

New Bedford July [June] 11th 1852
C. B. H. Fessenden Esqr
Dear Sir. This was the day I intended to go to Sandwich but am compeld to defer it having been confined to the house for nearly a week with the exception of riding out yesterday, hoping I should be able to drive as far as Sandwich to day. But feel that it is entirely unsafe as I have to much fever hanging about me. You will please address a note to each of the editors where the advertisement has appeared postponing the sale until July 12th I would say an earlier day but I have other engagements which will ocupy my time You will also send a written note to Swifts Monument Depot. Please make the correction in your notes to the editors I suggested in my last.

Very truly yours

 

New Bedford June 14th 1852
Lemuel Goddard Esqr, London
Dear Sir. Your esteemed favour of the 28th ultimo is received informing me of the receipt of Bills of Lading of Sperm Oil and Whale Bone from my Ship Washington via Hong Kong for Ship “Mahomed Shah” and that you had insured &c ~ I received letters some time since from Capt Palmer advising me of said shipment ~ In relation to sales I of course want all that can be obtained for the Oil & Bone. Still I am disposed to sell on arrival if a price corresponding with our market in this country can be realized. That is to nett me what the article is selling for here providing the expences are the same from Hong Kong as from our country If they are higher you may not make it average as much. I of course want a higher price if one can be obtained. I think quite a portion of the Whale Bone may be “North West” which is worth a higher price in our market than “Polar”. The slabs of the “N. W.” [p.49] are not as long as the “Polar” but thicker and there being but little of the former brought into market this season has advanced the price above the other Bones. Also from the well known character of Captain Palmer I have no doubt that the Oil and Bone were in fine order and quality when put on board of the “Mahomed Shah” You will please keep me advised of your market, of the arrival of the Oil & Bone and oblige

Very truly yours

 

New Bedford June 14th 1852
My dear Sir
Your favour of the 2nd inst is received ~~~ Have been sick or should have attended to your request earlier. Mr Taylor will forward your Policy and Premium Note by mail. I supposed you would want the script therefrom and have sent you the note to sign. I received letters from Lemuel Goddard London informing me that he had received Bills of Lading of Oil & Bone from my ship “Washington” I have requested him to sell if prices will nett what they do in this country. Nothing from Roscoe. Am feeling rather poorly. Will write you again soon
[To] Capt John Cole, Walpole N. H.

Very truly yours

[p.50]

 

New Bedford June 30th 1852
Mrs Charles Kempton
Your esteemed favour of the 27th is received requesting me to send you on your husbands account Fifty dollars Enclosed you will find fifty dollars the sum required which I have placed to your husbands account ~ you will please acknowledge the receipt of the same that I may know it is received~~~ I have not heard from the Lagoda since she sailed from the Sandwich Islands last fall, hope she is doing well however and that we shall hear of her soon all well ~
[In pencil] 1 – 50$ bill
No – 277 May 1st 50

Yours with respect

 

New Bedford June 26 1852
Lewis Charles Hunter
Dear Sir. There being at present a considerable real estate offered for sale as the Auction notices will show and in various others ways I thought it possible that I might be led into a worse speculation, than to purchase your lot on County & bush Street, if we could agree If I understand rightly which your lot is, I will give you eight thousand dollars for it cash. Provided I purchase it I shall not improve the lot by building for some time to come, and as the taxes this year will considerablely exceed those of any previous year, and will increase each consecutive year, it will together with the interest undoubtedly cost me ten or twelve thousand dollars before I shall build. Still the situation is a desirable one, provided a person is willing to make the outlay for house & garden of twenty five thousand dollars, which it [p.51] will cost me when completed.

The lot is objectionable on this on this account it has a greater depth in the rear north & south, than in front, and this of course means it of less value per rod
[Inserted on separate paper:] It is no small item to put up a suitable fence for building purposes, Bush street having been dug down about four feet, half the depth of the lot. It will cost, according to my estimate, a thousand dollars to fence that portion lying on County and Bust streets, provided it is done in a proper manner. I have one request to make of you, viz; - that you will please not use my name as having talked about purchasing the lot, as there are two or three others that I have in view, and it might prejudice my chance of obtaining them on as favorable terms as I should.

This offer is my ultamatum, I do not intend it as a standing offer longer than due course of mail, Still do not expect to change my mind for a week, unless I purchase elsewhere or unless my money
You can probably give me a deffinite answer within that time

Yours truly
J. Bourne Jr

 

New Bedford June 30
E. G. Peirce
Dear Sir
When I left you I did not distinctly understand, as we did not agree upon terms whether you wanted me to send the Moddle of the Hunter to you or not. Perhaps by this time you have come to my terms, One thing I beleive I forgot to say in our conversation viz, my terms was based upon the ship being covered with Spruce & norway upon the outside, but in our last conversation you proposed to cover with Hard pine same as Hunter. I did not consider that sufficiently. If I had I think I should advanced some considerably from the amt which I then had fixed, probably from five to ten hundred dollars, with the quarter deck off[?], Should you feel [p.52] disposed to write me in relation to these matters & the suggestions which I have made you can do so

Yours truly
J. B. Jr

 

New Bedford July 14, 1852
C. B. H. Fessenden Esq
Dear Sir
Since my return, I have thought it advisable when you advertise the farm for sale, to advertise for a tenant to occupy said farm on wages, or shares, in case it is not sold in three months, and invite those who wish for a situation to call on you at an early day.

This may lead to information which will be of advantage to me, as I fear it is exceedingly difficult to secure the services of a proper man for the business, I hope you have not forgotten the notice to quit the premises, or the copy of the inventory

Your truly
J. B. Jr.

 

New Bedford July 23/52
Mr E G Peirce
Dear Sir
Your two letters of the 13 and 19th have been received and contents fully noted, I will send the “Hunters” model by express Monday, as requested, And will make a suggestion for whom it may concern I think I would have the transom a little longer, and make the ship [p.53] aft, proportionably wider than the “Hunter”

In relation to another ship, I have never talked of one different from 115 feet long 16 ft deep & 27 ft wide, and do not wish to mislead from my first impressions, If I am, I shall exceed my estimates, which always bring with it disapointments and dissatisfactions, It was this, that prevented my obtaining for you the $300 on the “Hunter” But I still hope, and expect, to make it good; if as I before stated, the ship makes a good voyage no effort on my part shall be lacking, and so far as I am individually concerned of course you have my word which I mean to make as good as my bond. I must therefore decline your terms, I do not want so large as ship The ship that I build, if I build any, must come within certain limits. I have no master for a ship if I build one and it is only to occupy the mind that I think of building at all.

Leaving off your extra foot and quarter deck, I dout if we differ much in our views, I intend to go into the country by the finish of week after next, say about the first of August, for a few weeks, If you wish to have further conversation with me, perhaps you may have business in Boston, and from there take a trip to N. Bedford, In relation to the tiller Mr. Andrews says he will get one made and I will attend to the shimming[?] and get[p.54] the Blocks made in time for you My young man is sick, and I have just returned from my farm I have been spending the weeks, and can hardly tell what I have written, perhaps you can find it out, by taking time, should be glad to see you in N. Bedford if you can make it convenient to come

Yours truly
J. Bourne Jr

 

New Bedford July 24 1852
Mrs Weston S Briggs
Your letter of the 22nd is received, Inclosed I hand you twenty Dollars the sum request.

Yours Resp
J. Bourne Jr

P.S. I received letter from Capt Putnam of Ship Washington dated in Feby 1852 All Well

 

New Bedford July 28 1852
E G Peirce Esqr
Dear Sir. I have just recd your letter I am making every effort to get away in the early part of next week, Shall not return untill the last weeks in August, I cannot say any thing more favourable about our agreeing[?] than I did in my last letter
Should be pleased to see you if convenient to come

Yours truly
J.B. Jr

[p.55]

 

New Bedford August 2nd 1852
Capt P. E. Terry “Ship Stephania”
Respected friend,
Your two letters from Sandwich Islands & Hong Kong were duly received. You desired me to write you, not knowing what success you have met with the past season it is exceedingly difficult to tell how to meet the question.

If you should have been unsuccessful the past season, not coming up to the average of the ships that have arrived when you are at the Islands and Provisions are high, your help not the best for Whaling and the prospects no better than last season, I would obtain freight, & fill up my ship with Oil & Bone & come directly home. The Stephania is small and will do better for sperm whaling.

To undertake to refit your ship at the Sandwich Islands this season, will, I fear, cost a large sum and unless the prospect is better than I fear it will be for a remunerating catch, it will be better to adopt my suggestion for all concerned – I would advise you to talk with Capt. Tobey of the Lagoda if said ship should be at the Islands with you, as he is a man whose opinion I think well of, and, would advise you honestly in all matters concerning yours & my welfare, also, should you conclude to remain another season he would give you information about recruiting.

He recruited his ship at East Cape New Zealand, where he obtained Potatoes, Onions, Hogs &c in abundance & at reasonable prices - He then went to Tryphena Harbour for wood & Water where he found it plenty & easy to obtain, also Beef at 5¢ per lb and no danger of losing crew - This Harbor is situated on the S. W. part of Great Barrier Island about fifty miles N.E. from Auckland the Capital of New Zealand, from his account which I have no doubt is correct it is a fine place to recruit before going to the North West and can be done with safety against desertion and a great saving of expense. He will if necessary give you all the information in relation to it. In relation to recruiting another season one thing I must mention in strong terms. [p.56] I am very much opposed to any of my ships going to Hong Kong unless things have very much changed, which of course, there is not much probability, unless for the worse. In relation to coming home with freight, I hope you will have been fortunate & have no occasion to take Oil from other ships, if you do, take it from my own ships if they are there unless the Casks are too large to make good stowage, of course you will be governed somewhat by that. You are aware I suppose if you have Oil inboard & should take in a large quantity of bone, the bone would be very likely to cause the Oil to leak out, this very often occurs.

I trust Capt Terry you will act wisely & prudently concerning what I have said about going another season, if you should be so unfortunate as to come short of a voyage this season past, for all concerned – I hope you may fill your ship or nearly so, but I must acknowledge there has so many ships gone to those seas, I fear to learn the result from any of mine. The Washington to be sure, was well off when she went on & may if fortunate fill.

I have advised you according to my best understanding, still, as I stated in the beginning of my letter, not knowing what success you have met with the past season I can not tell how to advise understandingly –

You will learn what my wishes are under certain circumstances, viz, if unsuccessful the past season, not coming up to the average, Outfits nearly expended, Provisions very high, disbursements necessarily large for another season, Help not very good for whaling & prospects no better than the past season - with these difficulties staring you in the face you will know what my views are –

You will of course govern yourself as in your opinion will promote the interest of all concerned. Was I there when you arrived with all the facts before me, I could judge better what course to pursue, but, this is impossible therefore I leave you with these suggestions.
Hoping all things will turn out for the best

I remain yours truly &c
J. Bourne Jr

[p.57]

 

New Bedford August 2, 1852
My dear Sir,
You will doubtless recollect making a Mortgage for me of my Fathers Estate in 1847, for the payment of two notes for which I had become surety – Also, for a note of $800. which my Father gave me at the time for money he had received or might receive from time to time.

If my memory is correct, I gave my Father at the time my note corresponding with the $800. Note; said Note to be reduced as I made payments to or for him.

The object of my enquiry is, if you recollect of my giving such a Note; my father died about 18 Months since and no note of this kind has ever been found to my knowledge – The inference is if such a note was given he destroyed My impression is that you wrote both Notes, the one I hold against the Estate is in your hand writing.

The question arises in my mind whether I shall enforce the payment of the whole $800. or only the balance due, I having paid from time to time $300. about. If I gave him a Note he probably destroyed it before his death and in that case undoubtedly intended I should be the gainer of $500. If I did not give him my Note, he trusting to my honor in case the note was not absorbed before his death, it is clear that I should only exact so much of the Note as I have advanced to and for him. An early reply from you will very much Oblige your friend,
[To] John A. Kasson Esq, St. Louis, Mo.

Yours truly &c
Jona Bourne Jr.

[p.58]

 

New Bedford Oct. 20 1852
Mrs Weston S Briggs
I recd your letter asking me to send you Thirty dollars, for your own use, on your husbands account, Inclosed please find the sum required. Say $30. I shall expect the Washington home in the Spring, but of course cannot tell for a certainty untill after the N W season

Yours resp
J. Bourne Jr

 

New Bedford Nov 1852
Mr E G Peirce Esq, Gardiner
Dear Sir. I would like to hear how you are progressing with the new Ship ~ if the model has been completed, and the keep obtained. Also, if the southern pine plank, or timber from Dover has arrived, and if any ice has made its appearance in the river. Please write me how far you have advanced, as I feel anxious to get her along as fast as possible

Yours &c
J. Bourne Jr

 

New Bedford 11 mo 30 1852
Edward C Fisher, Richmond, Vi
My dear Sir. I received a letter from Capt Holt of Ship Hunter dated Honululu Sandwich Island Oct. 2 1852 announcing their safe arrival at that port after a very tedious cruise of six months [p.59] in the Okhotsk Sea. The weather was quite severe with much ice & fog. They have obtained 1500 Barrells of Oil, Capt Holt had been sick but had entirely recovered, Spoke of his Officers and crew as being well, Said he should write again before sailing. If you have not already recd a letter from your son, you probably will by the next mail

Yours truly
J. Bourne Jr

 

New Bedford 12 Mo 1852
Dear Sir
Your letter of the 22nd ultime has been recd. I hope Joshua has obtained the full amount of fun which he promised himself when I last enstructed [?] him to surrender [?] those articles asked for by Mrs Gibbs, but he has been blind to his own interest comfort and happiness. My last interview with him satisfied me that my duty toward him was at an end, that I had borne his abusive tongue long enough, and I told him that he might expect nothing more from me

His pretended claim upon the estate is considered by every one to whom I have spoken on the subject extremely foolish and absurd. That he is very much indebted to the estate no one but himself will deny. As evidence of that fact, he could not or did not support his family (which then consisted of his wife & one child) previous his taking them to that homestead, which, in his letter to me he has so much despises, but which has furnished him, and them (now numbering eight or nine persons) with a better living then he had ever [p.60] procured for them before, or will ever again, I fear, for I see nothing in the future but poverty, and distress.

He talks about money belonging to his wife which has been recd at sundry times, and expended upon the farm. Foolish fellow if he has recd money, that he did not take care of it. This matter, I am inclined to believe, when investigated, will turn out to be about $15~~ recd from Brooklyn, I think in the year 1839 or 40. I am prepared to [?] when that was expended, not further off than Boston, As for the 600$ recd from St. Louis, from a Mr Cady, I am well acquainted with a distinguished attorney in that City who will if it becomes necessary investigate that matter And if I am not grately deceived, from that letter, and its contents to be Moon shine. Joshua has been indulged in his mad career for the past two years (quite too long for his or our benefit) we hoped he might do better. But it was hoping against hope, and the time is now near at hand when he must leave the premises, to the poor-house, I fear him and his family will go ultimately. He need not please himself with the thought that he may remain in his present home, for he cannot, that matter is settled beyond all controversy, As you well know, As soon as the other family is ready to move in

Entertaining these opinions, I cannot believe it to be my duty to leave an unjust demand to arbitration without the consent of the heirs, which they decline giving, If he can obtain their consent, nothwithstanding his abuse to me from time [p.61] to time I shall not approve such a course

Whenever circumstances shall require, my Attorney here is ready to cooperate with you in defending the rights of those who have claims upon that estate and can & will maintain them
To CBC Fessenden Esq, Sandwich

Yours truly
J Bourne Jr

 

New Bedford 12 Mo 6 /52
Mr E. S. Upham
Dear Sir. I red your letter of the 9th inst. Inclosed I hand you list of riggin as furnished by my rigger. You say you would like to furnish the Blocks for my ship. You may give me your lowest price payable when the ship is finished. For dead & bulls Eyes Harts [hearts] Hanks & Hanspikes com[?] for a Merchantman. And in addition I shall want Cutting Blocks say 3 + 18 in double 5 + 18 in single 4 + 11 in single 6 + 10 in double for Boat davits Blocks. All to be made blocks bushed, & cast steel pins. The cutting and boat davit blocks to be made of seasoned white oak plank & boards. I shall want some of the ships blocks bushed with patent rollers which I will furnish. Mr Peirce furnishes the Dead Eyes & bulls Eyes that are to be strapd with Iron which of course you will deduct in your estimate. Let me hear from you soon. I shall want some spare blocks which I shall expect to have at the same date[?] of the others

Yours
J Bourne Jr

[p.62]

 

New Bedford 12 Mo 6 1852
Mr E. G. Peirce, Gardiner, Maine
Dear Sir. Inclosed please find check on Atlass Bank Boston for five hundred dollars. You will please place he same to the credit of New Ship and send me a receipt for the same & oblige. I recd your Telegraph disspatch this morning was sorry you could not come as I was anxious you should see two ship’s now here just fitting for the whaling business which would give you a better idea than I could my self by writing. I wrote you this morning by mail (before I recd the answer to my Telegraph) and hope that may bring you tomorrow I am almost inclined to come tomorrow myself to Gardner If I was quite sure you would not or could not come, After recd my letter, on the whole, if the day is as plesent tomorrow as at the time of my writing the chances are in favor of my coming

Yours truly
J. Bourne Jr

 

New Bedford Oct 22 1852
Mrs. I R. Cushman[?]
Your letter of the 17th is recd asking me to send you on hour husbands account one hundred & fifty dollars. Enclosed please find the required say $150~ Hoping it will come safe to hand
[?] of the [?]
Bill 280, [?] of the fifty 125.

I remain Yours T
J. Bourne Jr

[p.63]

 

New Bedford 18 Decm 1852
E G Peirce Esq, Framingham, Maine
Dear Sir. I have been waiting for the Ships Dft & Model. The Blacksmith would like to commence on Iron work for Spars, and in order to fix plan of Spars would like to have Model before me.

Have you obtained your Oak Risers? Locust Counter Timbers? Has the riser closed? I would like to have large Knights heads & have them run down whole lenghts, Please write me how you progress
& oblige

Yrs
J. Bourne Jr

 

New Bedford 12 mo 21, 1852
Mr E G Peirce
Sir. I wrote you on the 18th inst, But neglected to say that in reviewing your letter 29th ultimo, You say the depth of ship Hunter underside of lower deck Beam to ceiling foot from the Kelson was 8 feet 8 in, in this I think you are mistaken, it should be 8 ft 5 in which is just the depth required for two of our longest casks, according to the plans include with beds for casks &c The ship ought to be 27 feet 10 in wide in order to stow[?] to a good advantage. And I hope you will be able to [spread] her to that width, I would like to have the stern rake a little more than the Hunters, I think it would give her a more sightly appearance. I of course cannot recollect much about the model having seen it so short a time, and then in an unfinished state. I must be governed more by the Hunters which is before me. I think you may agree with me in this particular (if it is not to late to make the alterations) but whether[?] Mr G a Peirce will or not is a question, Should you think unfavorablly of my suggestion, you will of course be governed by your own judgment in the [purchases] Hoping you are progressing finely[?] and to your own satisfaction
P.S.
When I made the order for bolt & spikes, I would suggest the p[?]icity of sending for all I needed as it can be returned if not wanted, And I have no doubt there will be a further advance soon. And I think the sooner you send for it the better, and dont forget your small stuff for top work.

Yrs oblg
J Bourne Jr

 

New Bedford 12 moo 23, 1852
Mess W Coleman[?] & Sons
Gentlemen. I am in want of a set of Blocks for a ship 400 tons, Also Cutting in Blocks Boat Davit Blocks &c at what reduction will you furnish for my former bill of same quality.
Please say by mail

Yrs very truly
J. Bourne Jr

[p.64]

 

New Bedford 12 mo 23, 1852
Mr E. S. Upham
Dear Sir. I recd your letter with price to block my ship In comparing with the Hunters bills, I beleive the difference is in favour of my Providence friends. Still as they furnish by list with Patent rollers bushings Iron Strapping &c &c I will give you the same oppitunity

I have therefore inclosed the list as made out by my rigger (the same that rigged the Hunter) I persum this list includes all the blocks, except the cutting in blocks & what hoop’s hanks 12 hand spikes one set of spare pump gear &c &c. You will notice that many of the blocks are to be bushed with Patent roller bushing & a number of them to be Iron Straped, this of course you will take into the estimate, As I shall expect, you to furnish rollers of the best quality And the blocks to be Strapd in a workmanlike manner. The Ded Eyes & Bulls Eyes you have a list off, of course you will include them also. You will make your price for the job furnishing all, & should any small article be omitted we shall expect you to furnish it without aditionall chage, I should like for you to give me your terms, as early as Monday or Tuesday of next week and return this list in your letter as I have not time to copy it.

Yours Very truly
J Bourne Jr

[p.65]

 

New Bedford, Dec. 1852~
Elbridge G. Peirce Esq
Dear Sir. Enclosed I hand you check for five hundred dollars. You will please forward me a receipt on account of new ship, and oblige.

I have sent by express a draft of spars for your examination, - also deck plan &c, &c ~ I have placed the mizzen mast where you first designed it should be, making the distance between the main and mizzen mast 28 feet, 9 inches. I am aware that it will interfere with the projection in front of the house but we must arrange that the best way we can.

You will have the goodness to draw the ship on a ¼ inch plan with these spars (unless you think they ought to be changed, if so write me) and send the draft made by you to me.
I notice the sky-light is too near the rudder-head, - the distance should be not less than 6¼ feet in the clear between the sky-light and rudder-head on deck.
Is not the upright of the stern of the side plan rather heavy in its appearance? – it looks to me as having too much rake. You can judge better of that however, than I can.

I notice you have marked upon the deck plan be aft the fore hatch two beams, 11½ & 12 inches. They are, no doubt, sufficiently strong for all ordinary purposes, still I have supposed from the weight of the try-works which are always to remain there while the Ship is at sea (say ten tons) they should be large beams – Also be aft the main mast; this space is probably the most useful room there is on the ship, while they are boiling. After the casks are filled they are rolled aft, there remain to cool, sometimes for days. The coopering is also [p.66] done there.

I like to have the close bulwarks on the bow to come rather further aft than those on the Hunter. I think it improves the appearance of the ship on deck and makes her more substantial.
Whole length of iron davits 13 feet 4 inches, 3¼ in diameter, work down to lower end 2¼, upper end 2 inches.

I learn from cuttermen who have put up iron davits that the Kingston Co. have taken the round iron from Boston, transported to these ports, drawn them down to their proper proportions, and returned them again to Boston for 2 cts. pr. lb. I saw one set which was fitted by them, and was very neatly done. These must be placed on each quarter of the ship, 12 feet from the after side of taf rail, a good-size timber to receive the after davit. This timber is usually of live-oak, or locust, but I suppose one of seasoned white oak must answer, although these will some water get down by the side of the davit, and cause it to decay. The timber must be bored with a pump-auger before they are set; say from the top of the plank then down 2½ feet, and as near plum from the center of the main sail on the quarter deck as you can get it down through the plank sheer entering the timber to the depth of 2½ feet ~

In relation to rudder-head, pale-hinge, side and stern-lights &c, &c, the establishment, of which Mr Greene is agent, do not make castings of any kind. Mr Richmond will be happy to furnish them, as reasonable as any one here. As to the quality of all articles he may furnish, I have confidence to believe they will be as good as those made by any other establishment –

I handed your list for spike and bolt to Mr Greene, and shall be able to send your bill to morrow [p.67] of the same - I want the three tops made as near a half circle as you can get them. I have talked with a Mr Crosby who has put Iron Boat Gun on several ships & will (if you want him) unless otherwise engaged come to Gardiner & make & put up the gun on new ship, his price is $2 per day & Expences bill, I think from what I learn of him he’s the best man for that business in our city

Yours truly
J Bourne Jr

 

New Bedford 1 mo 1, 1853
E G Peirce Esq
Dear Sir. I recd your letter of he 20th ultimo concerning recd for five hundred recd &c. From your writing I should infer that you had not obtained all your Southern Pine I had understood before that you had and am sorry to learn to the contrary

In your letter of the 25th you ask if the Ship is to carry four Boats, She is which will require Eight davits
I will state again as I beleive I have not since you wrote me the Hunter was eight feet 8 inches under the beams. I want this ship 8 feet 5 in under the beam two ft from the Kelson, According to the plan inclosed.

I think the cabin should be 6 feet 4 or 5 in in the clear under the beam I would like to have the Transoms covering in the Cabin with back walnut if you have no objections it wil not cost much more. It will not cost much more then clean pine & painting, the Daniel Wood was finished in this way and looked very neatly. I will pay the extra expence. [p.68] You say in your letter of the 25th ultimo that the height from the top of plank sheer to top of main sail is 36 inches & to top of monkey of monkey 16 inches, allowing water ways[?] & plank sheers to be 8 inches, will make height from deck to top of Monky Rail 5 feet This is rather to high for a whaler I am inclined to beleive that the main stansion should be 30 in & from top of mail sail to top of monkey rail 14 in I am aware that the Hunters main stansions were 32 in. but her monkey rail did not go around her, in this case it does.

Inclosed I hand you Mr Gr[eenes] memorandum of Rods and Spikes which will come forward Monday, the fact is they have not the whole order completed, as they are so [?] to fill previous orders, but will send the balance very soon. And possibly may have been to Boston to day, if so it will all come forward Monday. I have with your liberty given me in your letter of the 23rd added 11 Rods of Metal & five hundred planking bolts 7½ inches long. If either of these lots added by me are not used in the Ship, I want them as I have a ship to repair in the Spring and cannot buy of them now under 24 cents

I am happy to say that the Hunter has shipd home oil & bone from the Sandwich Islands, and if it arrives safely and turns to a good price I intend to bring your matter before the owners, and urge them to pay you without further delay from the proceeds.[p.69]

You suggested that I might send sheathing metal, with spike & bolt, this I could not well do, as I am not fully determined wether the ship will go off on right whaling, which would govern me some what in the weight of metal to put on

I have been looking over the draft of spars sent you and have come to the conclusion to make the following suggestions viz that you make the Dft, say the fore yard fifty five feet long 13½ inches in the slings for Top Sail yard 44 feet Top Gallant yard 33 Royal 22 feet, Main Yards same as on the plan 58 feet, Main Top Sail yard 47 feet Top Gallant yard 36 feet Royal 25 Mizen 43 feet Mizen top Sail 37 feet top Gal 22 feet Royal 16 feet,. May I ask you to send me the Dft, as amended in a day or two, unless you think it out of the way in some particular if so write me before making it, but should like to have it immediately on account of urgency[?] for Sails & Riggings

Yours truly
J.B.Jr

 

New Bedford Jany 9 1853
Mr E G Peirce
Dear Sir. I wrote you under date of the 1st inst recommending some change in plan of Spars as before sent you, and asking you to make Dft as amended (if no objections appeared) and send it back to me in a day or two, that I might have my riggin & sails made You will greatly oblige me by saying how far you have advanced with the frame of the ship, and sending me the plan [p.70] by express. The weather here has been remarkably moderate and plesent which must be very much in your favor

Very truly Yours
J.B.Jr

 

New Bedford Jany 10 1853
Mess M. Coleman & Sons
Gentlemen
I recd Saturday the two list of Blocks, also your terms for Strapd 87 blocks. Your Bill exceeds that given by my Smith, Seven dollars on the job, shall have to let him do the work. You will please Strike of the list the 8 Tripper blocks for boat Takle and add 2~10 in blocks for boat Takles, Patent, also 2 + 12 in Single & 2 ~ 4½ in singles (not Patent) I wish you would have the two Top Sail runners blocks fitted with plates either composition or Iron, for Chain runners. I hope you will finish the blocks there as mentioned per Inv[?] Shipd as soon as possible say by the 10th Feby, Send them by R Road as soon as ready You may make the Cutting in & guy blocks also

Yours truly
J B. J

 

New Bedford Jany 11, 1853
E G Peirce Esq, Farmingdale [?] Maine
Dear Sir. Yours of the 8th inst is recd You say you will piece the lower deck 8 ft 5 in under the beams 12 in from the Kelsons If I am not mistaken my letter says 2 ft from the Kelson, and since you have plenty of depth, you may say 8 ft 6 in under the beam from aft from the Kelson In speaking of the 2 ~ 3 in [p.71] surplus depth, I have no objections of course, to the ships being made as deep as the timber & stansions will admit off. You also spoke of the Metal [desiring] first rate but have to heat it in order to get a head That I had before mentioned You have to cut your bolts and allow for headway both ends, as both ends must be nealed [annealed] in the fire in order to heave & [ruff] I presume the deck Spike & nails will come forward in time. Your Brother has arrived at Sandwich Islands with 45 sp[sperm] & 2100 bbs Wh Oil done first rate glad for him having made two voyage in one -

Yours truly
J.B.J

 

New Bedford Jany 12 1853
Mrs Westin A Briggs
Your letter requesting me to send you fifteen dollers on your husbands account is received – Enclosed I hand you the sum desired, hoping Westin will arrive safely and in good time

I remain Yours
J. Bourne Jr

 

New Bedford Jany 17 1853
Capt John R. Holt
Dear Sir. I sent by the last Steamer Jany 5 per Adams & Co Express, one of Allens Whaling guns and twenty five bomb lances. Care of R Coady s/c Honolulu I forgot to state in my letter to you of the 4th inst cost of gun & lances, cost of gun $45 cost of each lance $3.50 or 87.50 for the 25, packing $3 – freight through to Sand Island $45, whole cost when landed at Honolulu $180.50. I have here this moment in case you wish to dispose of the gun or lances You will be in possesion of the cost and care [p.72] and can govern yourself accordingly. I have been presented with a Dft for acceptance - Your letter to the contrary notwithstanding, I do not mean to complain Capt Holt, but I am compelled to say that you left the Ochotsk Sea alltogether to early. And that my Ships never have been caught Whales in front. Capt [Fisher] satisfied me entirely on that point[?]. He has now gone to his long home and we will let the dead rest[?]. Hoping your next season to the North will be a more successful one

I remain yours truly
J.B.J

 

New Bedford Jany 17 1853
Mess R. Coady & Co [Honolulu]
Gentlemen
I send by the Steamer of the 5th inst by Adams Co’s Express one of Allens Whaling guns and twenty five bomb lances, to your care for my Ship Hunter Capt John R. Holt. I presume from his letter, he had given you directions which were necessary in case the Ship may not be at Honolulu when the gun reach there. The freight was paid through before they left N. York The net cost of gun & Lances packing & freight was $180.50. I shall also send in the Steamer of the 20th inst by same conveyance one gun & fifty lances freight paid through, for my Ship Marengo, Capt Z. A. Devoll. Should that Ship have landed & sailed when the gun & lances shall reach you, and any other of my Ships be there, and the Master wishes to take the gun, thinking it will benifit the voyage, you will please deliver it to him After waiting a reasonable time if neither of my ships come in, you may dispose of the gun & lances [p.73] at the highest price you can obtain, and pay over the proceeds to Capt Devoll or the Master of any one of my ships that may visit you next. The cost of the gun and fifty lances transportation packing &c &c is $282.50 I have recd many of your favors, for which you will please accept my thanks

Yours very truly
J.B. Jr

 

New Bedford Jany 18, 1853
Capt Z. A. Devoll
Dear Sir. I have sent to your order by Adams & Co Express, one of Allens Whaling Guns & Twenty five bomb lances to the care of R. Coady & Co, Honolulu freight paid through to Sand Islands The cost of gun $45~ cost of each lance $3.50 Packing & transportation total cost of gun & lances when landed at the Islands. I have been this particuler in order that you may know % what to sell the gun & lances if you do not want them. I have also sent to Capt Holt of the Hunter. I beleive there has been a few sent out to other ships, although it is rather expensive to send them by Express it is the only way we can get them to you in time I have no great faith to beleive what is said of them. Still they are no doubt the very best article of the kind that has been invented [Brand?] Whaling gun with us are entirely [out of date?] You should always have a lanyard attached to the gun when used in a boat to prevent losing it over board, as an accident of this kind would frequently occur in the excitement of taking a Whale Hoping it will come of service to you in obtaining a voyage

I remain
Yours truly
J B. J

[p.74]

 

New Bedford Jany 19th 1853
Providence Tool Co
Gentlemen
You may send me pr “R. Road” the following list of Hooks & Hanks, viz

DOUBLE

4 pairs--------1 1/2 in
8 pairs--------1 1/8 in
36 pairs-----------1 in
32 pairs---------7/8 in
88 pairs---------6/8 in
60 pairs---------5/8 in
[total]----238[?] number

SINGLE

8 pairs------1 5/8 in
8 pairs----------1 in
16 pairs---------1 in
18 pairs-------7/8 in
[total]---50 number
You may also send 2 ½ Doz 12 in marlin pikes such as you shew me in the box. Please pack them in a strong box or bundle & send your bill by mail with the discount off

Yours truly
J. Bourne Jr

 

New Bedford Jany 19 1853
Invoice of Whale Bone shipd pr Schooner Laura Jane by J. Bourne Jr and consigned to Mess Randall H Greene & Sons for Sale on the Shipper Account
Mess Randall H Green & Sons
Gentlemen. Inclosed I hand you bill of lading of forty four bundles South Sea W Bone Shippd pr Schooner Laura Jane and consigned to you The bone has just been to bundlers so is in fine order. I am desireous of closing up the lot as it is small & all I have remaining on hand I shall not limit you as to price, but still hope you may obtain a [p.75] satisfactory one.

I intend to be absent all of next week and if you wish to communicate with me please do it as early as Saturday mail

Yours truly
J. Bourne Jr

 

New Bedford Jany 21 1853
Mess W Coleman & Sons
Gentlemen
I forgot to mention in my letter of the 18th inst that I intend to have my cutting in blocks [Strapped] with Iron consequently, Shall not want the [?] cut for rope Straps, You may strike from the order the guy blocks (if not already made) and subsitute [Lignum] vitae dead Eyes with 2 in hole in them Center very Smooth, Size about 5 or 5 ½ in them Iron Strapping also

Yours truly
J.B Jr

 

New Bedford Jany 21/53
Mr. E G Peirce
Dear Sir. Your letter of the 17th inst, is recd, also plan of Spars by Express, Shall have to make some alterations from the plan sent, Enclosed please find check on Bank of Commerce for One Thousand Dollars. Please place the same to my acct & oblige will take receipts when I come

Yours truly
J.B.Jr

[p.76]

 

New Bedford Jany 31/53
Mr. E. G. Peirce
Dear Sir. You desired me to tell you the dimentions of the wooden part of the boat gear. The Beams side 10 in 8 in number, 10 feet long 5 inches thick, Side boards 8 in number, 1 ¼ in thick 5 in wide 10 feet long, clear stuff
Cranes stuff 52 feet 3 ¾ by 2 ¾ inch, braces 2 ½ by 2 in 24 feet whole length all of white oak
I sent you Griffins Naval Architect by Express & placed a bit of paper where there is a Dft of two Ship Cut Waters I like the form of the upper one, but the Head of the lower one best, would like to hear your Opinions

I hope you will secure me 80 of those Spruce Knees, and have them sided as we walked.
Please get the Spruce plank down from the Mill and have them stack up on the wharf as soon as convenient to do so.
I forgot to get the Depth between decks from lower deck to under side of beams. Please send it to me oblige
Please write me how far you have advanced since I left and if the weather remains good.

Yours truly
JBJr

[p.77]

 

New Bedford Feby 3 1853
Providence Tool Co
Gentlemen. Have you received my iron from Hook & Trembly[?] under date of the 19th ultime? Please answer & oblige

Yours truly
J.B.Jr

 

New Bedford 2nd mo 9 1853
Mr. Elbridge G. Peirce
Dear Sir. Your esteemed favour of the 5th inst is recd, Enclosed I hand you check on Bank of Commerce of Boston for four hundred dollars, which please place to my credit, on acct, of my Ship & oblige, Also send me a receipt per Mail & oblige. I am exceedingly anxious you should be particular when you lay your upper deck, and cause the spike heads to be well saturated with white lead before the bungs are down. I have no doubt a little pains taken in this matter is money as well laid out as in any other part of the ship, I would like to have the three thousand of boards you spoke of in your letter, and to add seven thousand more. If you can get them for me, also a lot of good spruce boards as I told you when their You had better hang on for your lead their if you can get it, as it has advanced now a further [rise?] [?] [from?] [Germany?] Metal 27 ¢ copper 32

Yours
J. Bourne Jr

[p.78]

 

New Bedford 2nd mo 9 1853
Gentlemen
Enclosed I hand you check on Bank of Commerce Boston for Eighty 31/100 dollars covering the amount of your bill Hook & --umbly of that city, less discount of 5 % as agreed upon Please acknowledge the receipt & oblge
[To] Providence Tool Co, Providence ~~~

Yours truly
J B. JR

 

New Bedford 2nd mo 21 1853
Mr E G Peirce
Dear Sir. Your letter of the 18th is received I have already handed Mr. the Hunters list for nails, and thought that was our last understanding that I should do so, And regret if you did not so understand it the price is the same as at Bath 24¢ In relative to side lights we use here nothing less than 6 in glass which come at $7~ for stern light if four is used 7 ¾ in glass $9 – if but two is used 8 ¾ in glass $11~ each I think you had better use Richmond and I can make him responseable for their being tight The 5 ½ in glass is altogether to small for Stern lights The pale Hinge will come with the nails same as Hunters also rings &c &c will send you some money this week.

Yours truly
J B Jr

[p.79]

 

New Bedford Jany 4th 1853
Capt Z. A. Devoll
Dear Sir
I think it probable that you will be at the Islands in the spring and will like to know the price of Oil and Bone, at home, also my opinion of shipping home. I think it will be well to ship a part on the whole of your Oil at Eight or nine cents pr gall. in any good Ship. Prefer a small sized ship to a very large one. On account of the great pressure upon the Casks. Whale Oil I suppose will run at about fifty cents pr gall during the present Year but may be lower the next. If the Average taken next year shall be two thirds of last. As for whale bone I have no doubt this article will be low.

They have paid too high a price for it by ten or fifteen cents pr lb at the Islands in settling with the men. I would not pay more than twenty cents pr lb for bone at the Islands, pay freight and suffer the shrinkage. In fact I should not want much at that.

Capt Devoll I received a letter from Capt Terry of the “Stephania” in which he wrote that he intended to stay the third season. If you shall meet him there before he may have purchased his provisions and will supply him from your ship without damage to yourself, I will send you out new provisions to meet you at the Islands the next spring, provided you will write me to that affect. This will be a great saveing to the Stephania and no loss to you. You will receive better and later packed provisions and fresher flour or any other articles you may let him have which he may need and you can well spare. [p.80] In case you should think of landing Oil or bone at the Islands to be shipped home I have the greatest confidence in Capt Maheu[Mayhew], he haveing shipped a number of cargoes to this Port which I have always noticed came out in good order. He understands the business knowing that without a sufficient quantity of wood the cargo cannot come safely. I doubt however the propriety of landing Oil in any considerable quantity and leaveing it after you shall sail. If you may think of staying the third or fourth season, write me what you wish sent out and I will duly consider the matter and write to you. You must also state what the Government charge and Expenses will be on provisions landed for such purposes. Hopeing you will be more prosperous during the next season, I will ask you to present my regards to your Officers

Yours Truly
Jon. Bourne Jr

 

New Bedford Jany 4th 1853
Capt P. E. Terry
I recd your letter of Nov 5 ~ was sorry you were not willing to follow my advice and have no doubt it would have been for the benefit of the owners if you had taken freight and returned home in the fall and the result will prove to be so in my opinion

I have written to Capt Z A. Devoll of Ship Marengo, to supply you with what provisions you ay need, provided he shall be willing to do so I will replenish his ship in the following spring by sending provisions out to the Islands where he will probably then be.

You will therefore call on him if he shall be at the Islands at the time you are there and ascertain what he may be willing to do. If he will [p.81] accede to my proposition it will undoubtedly prove a great benefit to the Owners of the “Stephania”

I entreat you not to think of remaining another season after you shall have been the third. If you do not get a drop come home as quickly as you can.

The price of Oil and bone at the Islands has been too high the past fall, particularly that of bone. The enormous quantity which has been taken must [?] the price very much. Bone should not be more than twenty cents pr lb and Oil thirty cents pr gall. If you should not have shipped home your Oil or bone when you was in the Islands in the fall, I would ship my bone and One thousand Bbls of Oil provided I could do so in a good vessel at Eight or nine cents

Yours Truly
Jon. Bourne Jr

 

New Bedford 1 mo 3rd 1853
Capt J R. Holt
Dear Sir. Your two of Oct 19th and Nov 2nd came duly to hand, and their contents have been duly noted. I have this day in connection with Mr. E C. Jones Shipped pr Adams & Co. Express to the care of R. Coady & Co China one of Allens whaleing Guns twenty five of his Bomb lances, freight through being paid. The Gun I had on hand, it having been during one voyage in the Ship Washington. But it was never used. And Capt Palmer did not wish to take it again. It was intended for lances or Irons and I think the bridge on the Bomb to sight through should be taken off.[p.82] The Lances are new and the Gun Equally as good as those sent by Mr Jones. I acknowledge I have as little faith in it as I had when Capt Fisher desired me to purchase it. Still if any good come from it I shall be contented, and will confess would have shipped another if the lances could have been obtained, but we was able to procure only seventy five, which was the number required to fill your two orders. I wish Capt Holt you would give me any information you may have received from persons who have used those lances in whalers, and the result, before you go to the N.West as I should like to put them into my Ships that may go from home during the coming season. If they will benefit the voyage. I have never seen any one who has demonstrated the advantage to be gained by throwing them into the huge monster of the deep. I also desire you to make mention of your minceing machine – how it works, and if you have used it constantly. Also of your craft, what the quality in toggle Iron, &c &c, what is most used also if tanks between deck are of any use to you. Your sails, what you think of Cotton Duck and Providence Blocks &c &c.

I ask some of these questions that I may be governed in my purchases in fitting a ship which I am now haveing built at Gardner Maine. She is to take the wind out of the Hunters sails in speed. I was very glad to hear that you had shipd Lathrop. Capt Toby says nothing about his whaling qualities, but I have no doubt he is a valuable acquisition, but like all other men of his Color is opposed to the Marine liquor law.~ But Capt Holt it is whaling we want when we send our Ships where the worm dieth not, and when the Oil is turned out, if handsome, no one asks if it were Caught by a white or black man ~

I would like to learn your opinion about [p.83] staying another season, Even if you should fill your Casks, and have me send out provisions, Casks, and other articles. You may need to prolong your voyage another season. In this case you would be obliged to ship home all but your ground tier, obtain Casks Enough to make your cruise sperm whaling, and return to the Islands in the Spring in time to receive the Provissions, Casks &c &c. Capt Holt I have a private Matter, which I wish to commit to you, which is this. I wrote to Capt Terry adviseing him to come home. I did it as gently as I could of course, as I knew nothing particularly against him, but I believed he had not men with him that would get a voyage, and I became well satisfied in my own mind that he could not get one himself if he should stay twenty years. Therefore I was anxious the ship should come home. He confered with Capt Toby, and the latter advised him to take freight and return home as I had written him. But in his letter to me of Nov 5 he wrote you thought he should recruit his ship and go another season. If he does go again do try to get him to go up with you, and if you shall be fortunate enough to fill, render unto him what assistance you can, I have a larger interest in the “Stephania” than in any other Ship in which I own. Should he be in Port when you are, any assistance you may render him will be gratefully received by your friend B. It was a good move for you to ship home your Oil, as I have no doubt it will bring a higher price this year than the next. I advise you by all means to ship more at 8 or 9 cents pr Gall, if you have a good opportunity in a good ship in the spring. The interest and saving of Insurance will go very far towards [p.84] paying freights. I have no doubt Oil may go down to fifty cents during the year, but still go lower the next. For the bone you have paid too high altogether ~ there has been so vast a quantity caught during the past year that the price must go very low. You settled too high by ten to fifteen cents pr lb. I think provissions will [?] high the comeing season. Prime Pork now worth $16.50 Beef $14~ and more likely to rise than fall. You sold Pork too low ~ ~ worth $50.00 as at San Francisco at the same time.

Please write me what the Expense is at the present time at the Islands on provissions, shipped out and landed there for other ships. Government charges &c. Also the price of pine lumber. Try Pat and Shooks[?]. This information will be of importance to me when I shall fit ships in the Spring. I will venture to make a suggestion, Capt Holt, although you may or may not agree with me. If I were master of a Ship and one good whaleman, that is one whom I considered better than another, and whales were wild and difficult to Capture, I should at all times send the boat which I thought would bring the whale. Such a course might make difficulty, I am aware. For instance if my best whaleman was my fourth mate and sending him first would in most cases, cause my mate to complain. I should say to the latter in the cabin, that it was perfectly apparent that the fourth mate was the most fortunate in striking whales, that I came for a voyage, that I presumed he and all others in the Ship did the same, and that under the circumstances I felt bound in justice to myself and Owners to use my best judgement to obtain one. Therefore should pursue this course to do so. I think in most cases any reasonable person who had [p.85] the interest of the voyage at heart, more than victory, would yield all personal claims, and agree with the Master. I hope Capt Holt if the Stephania shall be at the Islands before you leave, you will remember what I have before written, and Encourage Capt T. to go on the ground in Company with you. I have no doubt you may be able to render him some assistance, provided you may be fortunate enough yourself.

You have spoken of the House of R. Cody & Co in high terms and I have no doubt your praise is merited. Still my old friend James Maheu[Mayhew] is a great favorite with me ~ for honesty and integrity, he may have his equal, but he has not his superior at those Islands in my opinion. Should you ever ship by a vessel of which he has the control, you will find more care used in stowing your Oil than by any other concern. There will be no lack of wood, which is a very important item, if you wish your Oil to get home. He understands the business, has sailed for it, and knows it. What he agrees to do he always does, and if I am to have Oil left at the Islands to be brought home, I prefer to have it left with him, rather than with any other person

I do not wish to deprive the Gentlemen whom you reccommend of any merit, that may be due them ~ no doubt they deserve all you said of them

But I have known Capt M for twenty years and have always found him the same. Please present my regards to Capt M. also to your good wife, and accept them yourself. May He who governs the storms upon the mighty deep hush the howling winds, and the troubled sea, and return you safely, with an equivalent for the many hardships you must necessarily encounter [p.86] during a voyage of this kind.

P.S. I have recd many kind letters from the Father of Danny[?] Fisher and hope you may bring him home

Yours Truly
Jon. Bourne Jr

 

New Bedford Feb 24, 1853
C. B.H. Fessenden Esq
Dear Sir. Enclosed I hand you my account made up to 1st mo 1 1853 I have made it up with interest annually, and from conversation with our Judge of Probate. I think under the circumstance, it will [be] allowed. I have also put in the note of Eight Hundred Dollars given me by my Father in 1847 and covered by mortgage of same date. Whether I shall insist on payment of the whole of the notes, yet remains to be decided. You will look over the paper Enclosed and write me what course I had better pursue. Also talk with Abraham Nye concerning my last conversation with him, about Joshua leaving the premises and give me the particulars. If more property is to be sold the sooner it is advertised the better, and after I hear from you, I can say what lot I wish to have sold

Yours Truly
Jon. Bourne Jr

[p.87]

 

New Bedford 2 mo 24, 1853
Mr. E. G. Peirce
Dear Sir
Enclosed I hand you check on Bank of Commerce Boston, for Five Hundred Dollars on a/c new Ship. I presume Mr. Richmond has sent forward the nails, Rings, Hatch Rings, Pale Rings, &c &c as a part was packed last week, but was waiting to cast the rings, which he had not on hand at the time I gave him the order. You may send me a receipt for the check and say how far you have advanced, and what you have thought of another of the same mould. I hope you did not use that black Oak plank as I have a poor opinion of that kind of wood

Yours Truly
Jon. Bourne Jr

 

New Bedford March 1853
Mr E G. Peirce
Dear Sir. Your letter of yesterday is recd. I must ask the favor of you to copy the spars and send them to me in letter, the length and sizes. I have mislaid the one I took with you, and am not able to find it. The Sailmaker called for it this morning, and I thought I could put my hand upon it, but it is not to be found. I have had it since my return as I gave the sizes to the Blacksmith – further than that, I am sure I cannot tell what end it has made. You will please be correct in taking it off, as the sails and rigging will [p.88] both be cut from it. Please say when you write, what you will build a Ship, same as the on the Hoops[?], and that when you could leave her off. That is if you have any wish to.

Yours Truly
Jon. Bourne Jr

 

New Bedford March 1853
Mr E G. Peirce
Dear Sir,
I wrote you yesterday, but did not mention about the nails. They were sent I learn from Mr Richmond the 24th ultime, and hope they have been received by you. I want to ask the favor, that is, if it is not already done, as A Gentleman from our place talks of comeing with me when I again visit you, to dress[?] out those Iron bolts in through the main transom, and stem post, and replace them with metal and plug the Iron bolts which show through the forward part of the stem, fill the place well with white lead first, that the Iron rust may not show itself. Again I would ask to have that Keel filled if you intend to do anything further to it, and varnish or paint it over with lead color. I am inclined to beleive that varnish will answer the better purpose. You however will be the best Judge.
Should this friend come, I am anxious for the credit of all concerned, that things should look about right, not that it will make it any better. After all you know we have to please the eye in all cases.

Yours Truly

[p.89]

New Bedford March 2nd 1853
Capt P E. Terry
Dear Sir Thinking you might touch at some Port on the Coast, on your way home, I have thought it best to advise you in regard to prices of Oil and bone at home, that you might sell Oil and bone rather than draw drafts should you need funds. Sperm Oil is now worth $1.30 pr Gall, whale Oil sixty two to sixty five cents, whale bone, thirty cents could not be obtained this day. These prices cannot be obtained when the fleet begins to arrive ~ My present view is that you had better sell sperm Oil at One dollar twenty cents, whale Oil at fifty cents, whale bone at twenty five cents, than draw for money. I have understood that parties on the Coast did not want Head – always prefered Body – which is better for us. Head alone will command a higher price at home. When you leave a Port on the Coast for home, I should not want to have men on wages, as the chances are very small to take Oil when homeward bound. I would therefore reduce my crew unless they belong to the ship, to just men enough to work the ship home. Understand I dont mean to pay off your crew that you may have with you but not to ship others by the month.

Yours Truly

[p.90]

 

New Bedford March 8th 1853
C B. H. Fessenden Esq
Dear Sir. I wrote you on the 24 ultime, enclosing my account against my Fathers Estate and in that letter stated that if it was necessary to sell more property I would designate what lots I would like sold /on hearing from you/ that the same might be advertised. I also requested you to ask Mr Abraham Nye what progress he had made with Joshua in regard to his leaveing the premises, and give me the particulars.
Will you please answer the above as early as possible, as it is necessary that something should be done with the farm immediately for the season

Yours Truly
Jon Bourne Jr
Pr Geo W. Ellis

 

New Bedford March 10th 1853
Mess W Coleman & Sons
Gent. Your Bill of Blocks is recd, also all of the Blocks, with the exception of 1 8in double Block, which has not come to hand. I intended to have you send same number of other articles as furnished my other Ship Hoops, Hanks, Handspikes &c &c which you will please send the first Trip Capt Winslow makes.
Enclosed please find check for Two Hundred [p.91] Eighty four & 16/100 Dollars, being the amount of the bill less the discount. Please acknowledge receipt of the same

P.S. Please send the 8in Block with the other goods

Yours Truly
JonaBourne Jr
Pr Geo W. Ellis

 

New Bedford March 11th 1853
C B.H. Fessenden Esq
Dear Sir. Yours of yesterday is recd. Please write me what the balance of the account now is – the amount necessary to be raised, as it will be a guide to me in determining what lots to sell.
As soon as I hear from you I will inform you what lots to advertise

P.S. Please say if there is any objection to the account

Yours Truly
Jona Bourne Jr
Pr Geo W. Ellis

 

New Bedford March 12, 1853
Dear Sir
When I saw you last, you thought it quite certain that Joshua could be bought off and induced to quit the premises and go away.

I would enquire if any progress has since been made with him – I would suggest the propriety of your going up and telling him in a sort of familiar manner, that the notice which Mr Fessenden gave him is liable to be enforced [p.92] at any time, the property still standing in his name and that you have received notice from me that as soon as I can obtain a family to go on the premises, you will enforce it if so requested, which I most solemnly intend to do. If the fellow asks where you intend to put him tell him to the poor house if no other place is offered. I dont beleive it is my duty to encourage him in his idleness and get nothing but abuse from him. I am determined not to put up with it any longer.

I would further enquire of you the character of the man that lived on Mr Shadrach Freemans place and left it last fall – how you think he will answer my purpose how much family &c. I hope you will let me hear from you soon as I am anxious to make arrangements with some one soon
[To] Abraham Nye Esq
Sandwich

Yours Truly
Jona Bourne Jr
Pr Geo. W. Ellis

 

New Bedford March 15, 1853
E G. Peirce Esq
Dear Sir
Your favor of 11th inst is recd. Enclosed I hand you check on Bank of Commerce Boston for Eight Hundred Dollars. Your order was for six, but it being convenient to send eight have done so.

I have given up the idea of building another Ship this season - it first originated in this way, Mr Green was at Boston and was induced to believe that the present prices of freight was more profitable [p.93] than whaleing with present high cost of outfits. I told him I had no objection to sending her to Australia as I had no master, provided we could build another of the same model to receive her outfits, Casks &c that I had already purchased. Again there were parties who wanted a ship just now haveing a master on hand, if I could make a trade with them to my advantage I would do so, but both projects failed and if they had not, at the time you stated you probably could furnish another it would of course be too late for our business. I therefore for this year, have abandoned doing anything of the kind.

In order to cut my rigging I find it necessary to have the exact distance between the masts, also from knight head to fore mast. I have had some from the stanchions sealing[?] badly unless they are painted, please paint if possible. Please dont lay the deck untill the weather is suitable

Yours Truly

 

New Bedford March 16, 1853
Capt Warren N Bourne
Dear Sir. Your esteemed favor of yesterday, date is recd it will be impossible for me to leave home at this time for a day, and since you was here, I have seen a fine bay Horse which suits me very well if the price is right, intend to try him tomorrow. Should I not purchase him, and Mr Swift does not make [p.94] sale of his mare ~ perhaps I will in a few days go over, provided the weather is more moderate and see her. I obtained of Mr Thornton a Thousand Dollars last week for you and am waiting for Capt Robinson, have sent over to the Packet wharf for five days past hopeing to find him. I am very much obliged to you for the interest you took in visiting.

Yours Truly
Jona Bourne Jr
Pr G W. Ellis

 

New Bedford March 22nd 1853
C B. H. Fessenden Esq
Dear Sir. Upon reflection I have made another account deducting the $800 note, and put into the account what I actually paid. Although I have but little doubt that my Father intended I should receive the full amount, I rather err if at all against myself.
You will therefore put in this instead of the former one and govern yourself accordingly Let me hear from you often as matters progress
Please enclose the acct I sent you. It is not necessary for your wife to sign the deed to me

Yours Truly

[p.95]

 

New Bedford March 23rd 1853
Samuel Downer Jr Esq
Dear Sir. Annexed please find Invoice 39 Casks whale Oil /two tiers through the middle sent to the Depot this A.M. with orders to forward immediately
Have drawn on you this day at one days sight for Seven Thousand Dollars as pr understanding. Shall be ready for you to select tomorrow morning, hope you will be here as the weather is now good
I understand there are two or three vessels here that would like to take Oil to Boston

Yours Truly

 

New Bedford 3 mo 26, 1853
Dear Sir
Enclosed I hand you bill of whale Oil amounting to thirty three thousand two hundred thirty six & 50/100 dollars
I also enclose Capt Spragues bill of lading. I am desirous you should be very particular in checking the Oil by the road and vessel, as we were under a pressure of business at the time we loaded Capt Sprague and for a short time left some one to take account who may have committed an error. I supposed when you left that a part of the Oil was to remain on the wharf for a week or ten days. Mr Taber called and stated that you had agreed [p.96] with him to take the Oil if I had made no other arrangements, and wanted it the next morning ~ As I had not I of course consented to its delivery, but we could not be present all the time – hence the possibility of an error No Oil has gone but what you selected, but there possibly may be a mistake in takeing a few of the guages
[To] Saml Downer Jr Esq, Boston

Yours Truly

P.S. I have marked a few of the Casks with the marking Inv #15 if you like for me to take them at 2 ½ ¢ I will do so
26 4 12 Galls pr R. Road
34 4 18 Galls pr Schr Augusta

 

New Bedford 3 mo 28, 1853
Mr Thomas Hogan
Dear Sir. Enclosed I hand you by Munroes Express Seventy two & 91/100 Dolls being the balance due you for your late voyage in ship Washington, which I hope will prove satisfactory to you. Edward [S?] has settled all his difficulty with Capt Palmer and gone home should you at any time wish for another voyage whaleing please drop me a line by mail and I will answer you giving you information and would further say that I should like to have you go in another of my ships as Boat Steerer

Yours Respectfully

[p.97]

 

New Bedford 3 mo 28, 1853
Mr Wan[?]
Dear Sir. Yours of 26 inst is recd enclosing certificate of Deposit for Sixteen hundred ninety One & 16/100 Dollars in Bank of Commerce to Credit J. P. Barker Cash for Bill Oil for same amount sold you 24 inst

Yours Truly
Jona Bourne Jr
Pr Geo W. Ellis

 

New Bedford March 29, 1853
C B.H. Fessenden Esq
Dear Sir. Your letter of 28th is recd. I reply and say that I was not aware that I had ever authorized any one to make propositions to Joshua to leave his supposed claim to Refunds, without first obtaining the consent of the heirs, and then I should insist upon a rule of law. As for gracing my note for Four thousand dollars, I certainly should decline to do so under any circumstances.

Joshua has thrown all the obstacles he possibly could in the way to delay the settlement of the Estate. I am now willing for him to suffer a little for his misconduct. As for your telling him you would see him before removing him from the house, he will now rest contented without trying to find a place to go. I have no patience left with the fellow. Am now negotiating [p.98] with a family to go on to the farm and if we can agree upon times, Joshua must go without any warning except what he has had, and if to the poor house, so let it be
I shall write Mr Nye to-day and endeavor to find out what he has done

Yours Truly

 

New Bedford 3 mo 29 1853
Abraham Nye Esq
Dear Sir. I am exceedingly anxious to learn if you have made any arrangements about a house for Joshua, and what the prospect is of getting him out of the house he now occupies peaceably or otherwise – That he must vacate the house seems to be reduced to a certainty, and you will oblige me by giving me the particulars thus far, and if you have ever seen the man you talked of to me when here, in relation to going on to the farm. Your early reply will oblige

Yours Truly

[p.99]

 

New Bedford March 30, 1853
Mess Z. Southard & Co.
Gentlemen
Mr D R. Green desired me to forward you a sample of dark whale Oil I have on hand
The bottle contains samples from every Cask in equal parts.
There is about 80 or 90 Bbls and is free from foots. Casks very good. Will sell the lot at 52 ½ cents
Please answer pr Express

Yours Respectfully

 

New Bedford March 30, 1853
Thomas Beveridge Esq
Dear Sir
Your letter of 29 inst is recd. I am sorry to inform you that David ran away from the “Newton” at Lahaina one of the Sandwich Islands in Oct. last. What ship he joined I have never learned.

I did hope that David would continue in the Bark during the voyage and return home. I am well assured, that it was not from any bad treatment – but still when any one is disposed to change his situation they will do so if it is from bad to worse.

I hope he may return to you a better boy, than when he left.
In relation to the lad you speak of in your letter, I shall soon have[p.100] a number of ships to send away this season and will endeavor to bear it in mind and write you. There are no ships fitting at present.

Yours Truly

 

New Bedford March 30, 1953
Mess Southard Hubut & Co.
Gentlemen
Your Telegrahpic communication is recd in answer to mine, and according to your instructions shall send the Oil to the “Depot” tomorrow – as pr Bill annexed, marked S
Have added interest 4 months. Please send note for the amount

And much Oblige
Yours Truly

 

New Bedford March 30 1853
Mr E G. Peirce
Dear Sir. Your communication by Telegraph was recd this day. Will be at your place Monday, Providence permitting

Yours Truly

[p.101]

 

New Bedford April 1, 1853
Mess Southard Hubut & Co.
Gent
Your letter of Yesterday was recd this morning.
In regard to the selected Oil, I have 150 Bbls on the wharf belonging to Capt Palmer – He is out of town and I cannot sell untill I see him. I shall be in Boston on Monday next and previous to that time shall see Capt Palmer and will call and see you further in regard to it

I Yesterday sent you Bill of dark Oil and in that bill charged you 13 galls more than you have. One cask containing 98 galls there is fourteen out only the regular outs was taken. I also omitted to charge cartage to Depot which amounts to four Dollars, it stands thus
13 galls @ 53------6.72
Cartage------------4.00
[amount]-----------2.72
Two dollars seventy two cents due you which please deduct

Yours Truly

P.S. Have sent the Oil to Depot

 

New Bedford April 1, 1853
C B H Fessenden Esq
Dear Sir. Your letter of 30 ult is recd. I think I understand the meaning of the proposition of depositing notes with referees – that I shall be liable only for the amount of the award of the Referee, let the note be [p.102] more or less.

I cannot concur however the propriety of my giveing a note for more than the value of the property, can you? And feel unwilling to put myself in a position to be compelled to pay over twice or thrice the amt of value of property left after paying the just debt against the Estate if the Referees in their sympathy for Joshua should so award

I think upon further reflection that I will let the prosecution for settlement now in progress go on
The suit against me to be brought before the Court next week I wish you to attend to and have the same put over to the next Court, when we will be ready
If Joshua will obtain the consent of Mrs Green and Mrs Gibbs, I shall entertain leaving it to Reference more favorably

Yours Truly

 

New Bedford April 1, 1853
Capt Martin Palmer
Dear Sir. Your note of the 25 ultimo is recd Appraising me of your safe and present abiding place. I propose going to Maine next Monday, leave here in the Midday train and will meet you at Mansfield, or if we should miss each other will propose to meet you at Sturtevant & Edwards [p.103] Oil dealers Broad Street Boston, shall leave Boston for Maine at half past two O clock P.M Then will to see wish of your wife returning to her friends at Norton if she desires to

Yours Very Truly

 

New Bedford April 2nd 1853
Saml Downer Jr Esq
Dear Sir
Yours of Yesterday is this moment recd. I cannot get account for the missing Cask, but presumed the Capt has delivered all he took on board and have no objection to your settleing with him

Yours Truly

 

New Bedford April 4, 1853
C B H Fessenden Esq
Dear Sir. Your favor of 1st inst is recd. Mr Nye will please hire the house belonging to Franklin Blackwells Estate for Joshua for six months, if it cannot be hired for six, he will please hire it for twelve months
If this house cannot be obtained, I wish him to get one somewhere else, in the neighborhood if he can, and I will be responsible for the same.
As soon as a house is obtained I wish notice to be given Joshua to remove from where he now is, and if he refuses [p.104] to have him removed immediately
I go to Maine to-day: when I return shall be in Sandwich
I am anxious that this matter should be accomplished at once, as it must be sooner or later and it is better that it should be done now. Please see that it goes immediately forward

Yours Truly

 

New Bedford April 4 1853
Mr Briggs
Dear Sir. Your letter is recd. Mr Bourne is now absent, gone to Maine. When he returns the last of the week, will send you your account and the Two hundred dollars asked for.

Yours Truly
G. W. Ellis for J Bourne Jr

 

New Bedford April 8, 1853
Mr Elbridge G. Peirce
Dear Sir. Enclosed I hand you Samuel Downer Jr check on Eagle Bank of Boston for One thousand dollars, which I presume will pass at your Bank as Cash. You will please acknowledge the receipt and oblige. I hope you will have the upper deck caulked as soon as possible that the fresh water may be kept out of the ship

Yours Truly

[p.105]

 

New Bedford April 11, 1853
Friend Briggs
Enclosed I hand you Two hundred dollars, and your account with owners of ship Washington showing a balance due you of Fourteen hundred twenty three & 73/100 Dollars

I would also remind my old friend of the conversation we had when you arrived - that it was a good Voyage and it was a good time to save something for a rainy day – this of course is none of my business, but only offered by way of advice. Hopeing it will come safely to hand and prove satisfactory,

I remain
Yours &c

[P.S.] Capt Palmer is at Norton was not very well the last time I heard from him, would (I have no doubt) be very glad to see you if convenient to take a trip up there

Yours Truly

 

New Bedford April 11, 1853
C B. H. Fessenden Esq
Dear Sir. In regards to a house for Joshua, I prefer the one now occupied by E O. Packer[?] if he can be bought off at a reasonable rate to the one owned by Henry Blackwell near Reuben Ellis’

Yours Truly
Jon. Bourne Jr
Pr. G W. Ellis

[p.106]

 

New Bedford April 11, 1853
C B. H. Fessenden Esq
Dear Sir. In regards to a house for Joshua, if you have not already removed the family, I prefer the house now occupied by E O. Packer if he can be persuaded to leave it by paying him a fair compensation for so doing ~ to the one owned by H G. Blackwell near the house of Reuben Ellis

Yours Truly
Jon. Bourne Jr
Pr. G W. Ellis

[p.107]

 

New Bedford April 16,1853
Mr Edward B. Gibbs
Dear Sir. Enclosed I hand you thirty dollars makeing with the twenty I handed you yesterday Fifty which I have charged you on account. The “Lagoda” has been spoken Feby 20th and will undoubtedly be in soon Shall then want that timber, will write you again however in time for it. I called at the Union store at Agawam and made some enquiries about Bump who worked for Collies but did not see him. The keeper of the store spoke of two men who be thought would suit me Levi Sampson and Ephraim Chubbuck[?]. Sampson he thought a superior man. I desired him to mention them both to you if he saw you. You will please write me if any thing of interest should occur and have them get out my dressing in time

Yours Truly

[p.108]

 

New Bedford April 18, 1853
Mess W. Coleman & Son
Gent
Your letter of 11th inst is recd. I wish you to send the articles as named in my letter of March 10th by Capt Winslow
And Oblige

Yours Truly
Jona Bounre Jr
Pr Geo W. Ellis

 

New Bedford April 20, 1853
Mr E G. Peirce
Dear Sir. I have put on board Schr “Mary Shields” Capt White the Iron work for the spars. Also 10 side lights, two of which have been used which I furnish for the Bow. Also Hatch nails, skin nails for coppering purposes, and 6 sheets of copper, 12” finishing nails for Cabin &c &c. You desired me to furnish you with dimensions for boat gear. 8 Beams 10 ft long side 10 inches 5 inches thick 8 Slide boards 10 ft long 5 inches wide 1 ¼ inches thick (clear stuff). Crane stuff 8 Standards 2 ft 11 inches long 3 ¾ by 2 ¾ 8 Arms 3 ft 6 inches long 3 ¾ by 2 ¾ 8 Braces 3 ft long 2 ½ by 20 inches. I gave your list for Schr Rigging to Mr Rotch and understand they will forward it in time. Please let me hear from you how advanced in planking. I suppose the freight on the articles sent by the Mary Shields [p.109] will be the same as on the Hunter which I think was three dollars

Yours Truly

 

New Bedford April 22, 1853
Mr E B. Gibbs
Dear Sir. I have sent by Capt John Bournes vessel 7 Bbls Guano and a lot of old window sashes which I think may be useful when I build my shed or other building. You may put them into the loft of the shed at the Barn. I think there is about 1200 lbs of guano. I would put the contents of four or five Bbls of this on the oat land below the barn, and reserve the balance for the corn to put in the hill after the corn is up. I recd your letter apprising me of your interview with Mr Shaw. I agree with you that the terms are rather high. I think some of declining them, and look further – Hope you will make what enquiries you can and possibly may hear of some one else that will answer. I am rather particular about the wife, hopeing to find some one that may answer well for indoor as well as out.
I may make Mr Shaw a proposition which possibly may answer. Shall write him as early as Monday

Yours truly

[p.110]

New Bedford April 23, 1853
Mr E B. Gibbs
Dear Sir. You may omit purchasing shingles if you have not already done so as I learn the sawed pine shingles are not worth laying for roofs. The Lagoda arrived last night, will write you when I want the timber

Yours Truly

 

New Bedford April 25, 1853
Mr Truman[?] Shaw
Dear Sir I recd a letter from Mr E B. Gibbs saying you had been to Monument, to see my farm, and that you would take charge of it for $30 pr month through the year with other privileges &c &c

This in my opinion is too high a price – The whole product of the farm for the next two or three years will not pay your wages. I had hoped we might agree but if this is your lowest terms, of course we shall not, but if you are willing to take something less, and will come to New Bedford immediately and see me, if we cannot agree I will pay your fare both ways

Yours truly

[p.111]

 

New Bedford April 25, 1853
Mr E B. Gibbs
Dear Sir. I wrote Mr Shaw this day but did not feel that it was for my interest to give him his price for the reason that the whole product of the farm when sold would not bring the wages, then add the taxes, interest on the cost, stocking it fences &c will put it in debt a trifle further than I want it to go. If you think it best I would try John Crock[?], provided his wife is a decently clean, and tidy woman I would reserve the front room and chamber over it. Also Fathers bed room, and then it will leave house enough for them, and in the course of the year I could find some one that would suit me better in-doors perhaps If you think well of it, and will write me when John is at home, I will go down and see him, and Capt Ryder and perhaps can make a bargain. Of course I shall not expect to stop at the house myself if this family go in, but shall make a [?] of the present incumbrances &c and be prepared for a better arrangement next year. Let me hear from you;

Yours Truly

[p.112]

 

New Bedford April 25, 1853
Capt Asa S. Toby
Dear Sir
Your letter of this date is recd. I do not understand from your letter, that you wish to reserve your bone, but Oil, and as the quantity of sperm is so small I think we had better sell that altogether. We have not time now, to go into any calculations, but presume we shall be able to furnish you with what necessary cash you want unless you go into some more wild speculation like Glass Manufacturing Stock.
I sold the bone deliverable from the ship for 29 ½ cents pr lb. and offered this day the “Hunters” for the same. Will sell it to you, if you want to purchase it, all dry and nice

Yours Truly

 

New Bedford April 25, 1853
Mr E G. Peirce
Dear Sir. Not hearing from you for some time, I begin to fear that I shall not be able to get my deck and Knees for the “Lagoda” by the new Ship. The “Lagoda” is in at the wharf, and will be discharged this week, and ready to commence stripping down as early as Friday, and shall soon want the deck and Knees [p.113] I hope you have got on her plank shear and rails, as I am exceedinly anxious to get the Ship early in the season, that I may not be deceived, as in 51, and while the other ships are lying at the wharves in order to compare with them.

Yours Truly

 

New Bedford April 28, 1853
Capt Asa S. Toby
Dear Sir
Your letter of 26 inst is recd. In reply am sorry to say that I sold the entire lot of whale bone from Ship Lagoda for 29 ½ cents pr lb as delivered from the ship and considered it a good sale at the time, having obtained ½ cent pr lb more than I. Howland Jr & Co. and some others. I thought from the conversation we had before you left, and from your letter of the 25th inst in which you say that you wish me to reserve your one 12th share of Oil, but if you intended to include bone you did not, and as the letter will show. So far as I was concerned of course it did not make any difference to me whatever, and I regret exceedingly the sale was made. But there is no help for it now. Perhaps you would like to reserve the whole of your oil as the bone is sold, if so please say so by return packet The bone weighed out 34495 lb. My advice is that you had better sell your Oil

Yours Truly

[p.114]

 

New Bedford April 29, 1853
E G. Peirce
Dear Sir
Enclosed I hand you check on Bank Commerce Boston for Six hundred dollars on account new ship. The length of fore sail on the foot is 44 feet 6 inches, length of main sail on the foot 52 feet 6 inches. There is no danger of getting the chocks too far aft.
Have the articles arrived by the “Mary Shields”? The plank shear and rails are they on?

Yours Truly

 

New Bedford May 2nd 1853
Mr E G. Peirce
Dear Sir. When I wrote you last I forgot to say anything about Spruce Spars I would now enquire what spars of the following dimensions Viz

55 feet length 13 ½ inches in truss
44 feet length 10 ½ inches in truss
40 feet length 9 ½ inches in truss
34 feet length 7 ¾ inches in truss
38 feet Topmast 12 ½ inches

If you will tell me what the above can be purchased for I will reply and say how man I want if any

Yours Truly

[p.115]

 

New Bedford 5 mo 3rd 1853
Mr Josiah Foster[?]
Dear Sir. Not haveing heard from you since you left, I begin to fear that you may be sick – would like to hear from you or see you and learn what your views are in regard to another voyage, also to settle the last, as the Oil and bone is all disposed of. Will you please come to New Bedford, or write me as soon as this comes to hand

and oblige
Yours Truly

 

New Bedford May 3rd 1853
Capt Martin Palmer
Dear Sir. I think some of going to Gardner Friday night, can take the Steam Boat in Boston at 7 Oclock and be in Gardner next morning at 8 Oclock If I go should like to have you go with me, and Mr Willard if he is here Mr Peirce wrote me he wanted to see me, as they should be finishing up on deck, we will leave there Monday afternoon and arrive in Boston Tuesday morning.

Please write me if you will go, and I will then decide whether I can leave
I will pay Expenses if you go

Your Truly

[p.116]

 

New Bedford May 3rd 1853
Mr Geo A Simmons
Dear Sir. Enclosed I return Bill Sperm Oil receipted – Note received for which I am much obliged. Lagoda Whale oil all out of the market. I think you may not beleive I have told you some truth about Whale Oil

Yours Truly

 

New Bedford May 4, 1853
Capt Asa S. Toby
Dear Sir. Jose Francis appears to have steered a boat. You will please tell me by letter all the particulars in relation to his shipping from the [?], when he commenced steering a boat, how much Oil you had at the time, and what understanding there was with him. Also what the understanding was with Baxter. I infered from your letter to me from Sandwich Islands, you had got clear of the men you discharged without any expense to the ship. As to his being under age, which his father talks about – I understand from Peirce A Fisher[?] that Baxter was now about twenty four years of age. I am willing to do the right thing but if he was of age, and left the ship with all on board, I see no reason why the proceeds should not go to make up for those who left in debt, it is a poor rule that will not work both ways

Yours Truly

[p.117]

 

New Bedford May 4, 1953
Doct David Fisher
My Dear Sir. Haveing tresspassed upon your time and patience once before in a matter of this kind in relation to the recommendation of Capt Vincent although I did not profit by your advice in takeing him for Master, it was because I had shipped another man before I saw him, which has no doubt resulted to my disadvantage.

I will again ask of you as a special favor to inquire (if you do not already know) of the qualifications of Mr Holly late mate of the Ship Champion of your place. I want a master for the Ship Washington of which I have a large interest, and have a strong desire to provide her well for a voyage and as you well know unless we do so, the business would be followed with a loss as in many cases now. I have said nothing to Mr Holly, neither do I know him but he has (through another party) been named to me as a young man of considerable enterprize and one who has got ahead in his profession rapidly. You may know the family together with some knowledge of him, with what you can learn of others will enable you to judge very correctly of him, and will write you the particulars. You will

Very much Oblige
Your friend

[P.S.] The Lagodas Oil is sold, if proved to be a very handsome cargo in color

[p.118]

New Bedford May 5, 1853
Mr Joshua Remmington
Sir
I have from 20 to 30 Bbls of very good Slush which just discharged from Ship which I will sell you, if you wish to purchase. Please inform me immediately

Yours Respectfully
Jona Bourne
Pr G W. Ellis

 

New Bedford May 5, 1853
Geo A. Simmons Esq
Dear Sir. In my hurry I omitted to receipt the bill of Sperm Oil, supposing however, that I had done so. I now enclose it receipted. The Lagoda Oil is sold to Whittman & Co 1/4 Palmer & Ricketson 1/4 , Saml Leonard 1/2. After deducting the Captains share of 200 Bbls. There has been considerable sales, but to what extent have not learned as I am very busy seldom go up town being very busy. Expect to be in Boston soon and will call and see you

Yours Truly

[p.119]

 

New Bedford May 5, 1853
Capt Martin Palmer
My Dear Sir. Your esteemed favor is recd. I regret that you cannot accompany me to Gardiner but of course submit to your decission, as I am aware you have been intending to make your Western tour

I shall under the circumstances defer my visit at present. I will again urge your acceptance the offer of the new ship as I have no doubt you will make (with a common share of success) a profitable voyage The “Emma C Jones” is just reported 8 months out with 300 Sperm 500 whale oil.

You see there is still a good chance for a beginning in this Ocean, before going to the No West Coast, and should you conclude to remain at home for a year and try some other business, the opportunity you would now have of obtaining a satisfactory voyage to yourself, and owners lessen. I am aware Sir that it is unnecessary for me, to have said that you very well understand the whaling business is not growing any better, and that every year lessens the chance of a successful voyage. Still I have full confidence of one more, and probably two more voyages but as you can go now with a gang and good as any other ship that sails from our Port were you my own brother, and did not own the stick of timber in the Ship, my advice would be the same. It is the course which I have always pursued myself – never surrender a certainty for an uncertainty. You have the confidence that [p.120] with the same chance with others you can obtain as much oil, as the best of them Therefore embrace the opportunity, and after another voyage you will if successfull have a competency to remain at home – buy land or stock and go, and come, whenever you please, and it suits your own convenience. With these suggestions I leave the subject, hopeing that you will at your earliest convenience write me after reaching your place of destination I will close with the wish that you may go and come safely and not get run off the track

I am Yours Truly

 

New Bedford May 6, 1853
Mr Charles Kempton
Dear Sir. Your favor of 3rd inst is recd. I am sorry that you should have suffered from a cold although I believe it is very common for sea faring men to have colds on their returning to land.

In relation to the Oil, and bone I am happy to say turned out well. Whale Oil 2414 Bbls, Sperm Oil 38 Bbls, whale bone 34495lbs, and the whole cargo is sold, - bone at 29 ½ , whale oil 51 ½, Sperm Oil 128 cents pr gall. Considerable whale oil has already been sold at 50 cents - Hope you, and your good wife will soon regain your health

I remain
Yours Truly

[p.121]

New Bedford May 6, 1853
Mr Edward B. Gibbs
Dear Sir. I wrote you last Friday 29 ultimo, but have heard nothing from you – I hoped you could have made some arrangements with John Crock to go on to the farm, and still hope something of this kind can be done.

In relation to timber I begin to think that I shall need more pine timber than you have cut, and would like another vessel load if I can get it. I think however I should not like it cut quite so near the top, as the small pine timber is but little use to me. If there is not enough on the company lot, perhaps it can be made up from B. Bournes’ lot, if he would like to sell
Please let me hear from you in relation to the above

Yours Truly

 

New Bedford May 7, 1853
Capt Asa S. Toby
Dear Sir Your favor is recd. I am aware how you are situated, with the parents of those young men, all around you, and I suppose constantly tell you of the amount of money the Ship has made, and their necessities You must be cautious what you say: You perfectly understand that my duty is a different one, I as agent for the ship have among the owners, the widow, and the orphan to decide [p.122] for, as well as those who was in the ship, and am disposed to do justice to all concerned, but sympathy must have nothing to do with the case at all. You had better come over tuesday, and help me arrange the matter. When a young man is promoted on the voyage it is his benifit, as well as the owners, as it enables him to get a better chance on another voyage, and should be so considered.
I would not say anything to Mr Baxter that you was comeing, as I do not want, too many to talk to at one time as I am very busy

Yours Truly

 

New Bedford May 9, 1853
Capt Augustus Hale
Dear Sir Your favor is recd and I handed the letter to Mr H. H. Crapo who is public administrator, and to day is the first movement made in the promises he has sent for the chest and clothing of Mr Heath. I presume to sell the same. Mr Philips called on me to day, and asked me if you was intending to go to sea again, I told him that was more than I could tell as you had never intimated to me in relation to another voyage. If you have any such idea I wish you would say so to me by return of mail, as I have the ship Washington ready to put in, and have not as yet shipped a master She is a first class ship haveing been rebuilt previous to her last voyage and having taken a cargo [p.123] of riseing $70,000, and returned in 29 months
Please let me hear from you pr return mail

and oblige
Yours Truly

 

New Bedford May 10th 1853
Mr Holly
Dear Sir. I am in want of a Master for the Ship Washington, and if you are disengaged would like to see you, and would ask of you to come to New Bedford in tomorrows Boat In the mean time perhaps it would be as well not to say anything at present about my writing for you, as no possible good can result from giveing it publicity.

Yours Respectfully

 

New Bedford May 10, 1853
Doct David Fisher
My Dear Sir. Enclosed please find a letter for Mr Holly, which you will very much oblige, by sending to him as soon as recd. I have done so from the fact I did not know how far he might live from the Post Office, and am desirous he should receive it in time for the Boat tomorrow, and again I have suggested the propriety of saying nothing about my writing to him for the present

Yours Very Truly

[p.124]

 

New Bedford May 10th, 1853
Capt John Cole
My Dear Sir. Your letter of 6th inst is recd, and its contents fully noted, what led you to feel that I was the least indignant at your enquiries, is more than I can tell – that you was entirely mistaken I can assure you. I had at the time of the enquiries, none but the kindest feeling, and I can assure you, have never since cherished none other. You had a perfect right to make all the enquiries you did, at the time and further, it was perfectly natural you should do so, being away from the scene of action, and being here only at intervals.

In relation to cash matters, I did tell you that I had no doubt I could furnish you with cash, to the amount of two thousand dollars about the 10th of May, but if I recollect right, subsequently to that, you decided to draw your bone, and haveing sold the balance have charged you with 1814.45 as cash which with what I have paid you before, amounts to $2614.45 this, with what I have actually paid for outfits and crew, makes me out of pocket. I turned Mr Hale a six month note. I should have had funds of my own, but the “Lagoda” came in, and it took about $20,000 to clear her off. Consequently shall not for several months have any funds.

Yours Truly

P.S. Please say if you wish your bone insured in shed, it weighed in 6099lbs

[p.125]

 

New Bedford May 12 1853
Mr E B. Gibbs
Dear Sir. Capt Clark has landed the timber in good order, two of the Oak sticks proved rotten. I have paid Capt C. freight on all 16 tons 3 feet including B. Bournes, which was 28 feet. I have also paid him for the wood 7 cords 6 inches. I wish you on the 6th inst for another deck load, if you could furnish it, but have not heard from you since should like to have it, if I could get it soon, but, if it is inconvenient, you may omit getting it, as I can get along without it. Ryder has not been in here to my knowledge I still hope something can be done by way of getting him. I saw Mr Parkers brother here to day, and he told me that he understood that his brother Erastus O. was intending to remove to [H ? ig] River next tuesday, if so, there will be no trouble in getting the family out provided I can get some one to go on to the farm which I hope I may. Let me hear from you in relation to the timber as soon as this comes to hand, also if you have seen Covell.
Since writing the above your letter has come to hand, As you have not got the timber you may wait untill you hear from me again

Yours Truly

[p.126]

 

New Bedford May 13th 1853
Capt John Cole
Dear Sir. I find it exceedingly difficult to get a Master for the Washington such as I am entirely satisfied with, unless I wait the Ship three months. I really want your views on the subject. I can have a Young man who belongs to the Vineyard although his experience is not as much as I wish it was – still he is from capital stock, and I think will perform well, in fact I have a very high opinion of his abilities, but he will not go untill the 10th of August. Shall I keep the Ship, or take some ordinary man, and send her to sea in a month. I can now obtain first rate under officers, possibly with the exception of chief mate.
Please let me hear from you by return of mail as I must answer tuesday morning

Yours Truly

 

New Bedford May 14th 1853
Mr Richard Holly
Dear Sir. I recd your letter covering your times for a voyage in the Ship Washington, and immediately wrote Capt John Cole, who owns one quarter of the Ship, liveing in New Hampshire saying to him that I had not been able satisfactorily to point the ship for another voyage unless I kept her untill the 20th August although [p.127] I think I understood you to say the morning you left the 15th. I shall get his answer tuesday morning in time to write you by that day Boat. You will reccollect I told you I should want to answer by the second Boat that brought your letter

Yours Truly

 

New Bedford May 14th 1855
John C Bull Esq
Dear Sir. Enclosed please find manifest of provissions shipd to New York by the Sloop Corinthian Capt Shephard for the “Astoria”. Capt Sheppard left here yesterday and will probbably be in New York Monday. I understand by Mr Jones that you expect to be in New Bedford before you leave – hope to see you

Yours Truly

 

New Bedford May 16 1853
Mr A R. Nye
Dear Sir. Enclosed I hand you Bill of Lading of one hundred thirty three bundles of whale bone from Bark Newton for Ship of the Sea. The bone was transhipped from Bark Magdala, and I had no knowledge of the fact, untill yesterday morning when the Bill Lading came to hand You will much oblige me by entering the bone and shipping the same by some New Bedford Packet, unless you will offer a price that will induce me to sell it. Please write me [p.128] when the bone comes out, its condition, with your best offer – if not previously sold I may be induced to sell there.

Yours Truly

New Bedford May 17, 1853
Mr Richard Holly
Dear Sir. I now have to say to you that I accept your time, as given in your letter to take charge of the Ship Washington, but am exceedingly sorry that you cannot shorten the time. Hope to see you soon, to talk about officers. I [?] expect the second mate of last voyage will go your mate. He is a very competent man, if I can get him – have never seen him since the day the Ship arrived, but some expect him here this week

Yours Truly

 

New Bedford May 17, 1853
Mr E G. Peirce
Dear Sir. I intended when I last wrote you, to have gone to Gardiner to day but circumstances are such, I cannot conveniently leave untill next week, possibly however I may go Friday. Enclosed please find check on Bank of Commerce Boston for Fifteen hundred dollars, on account new Ship. In relation to the lights sent, I was not aware [p.129] that the large lights was without a flange or rim. I will exchange them when I go down for others, or possibly, if we dont use the water closet below, make some other arrangements. I had thought of dispensing altogether with a light in the steerage, unless you have got it in, or left a place open for it in the outboard[?] I think now of steering with Reeds Patent apparatus, it is well approved of by our Master. Please let me hear from you on receipt of this. Capt Howland desires me to say to Capt Robbins to send his caps by the first vessel comeing to our place. Will you please say to him, and oblige

Yours Truly

 

New Bedford May 17, 1853
Mr. E B. Gibbs
Dear Sir. I have recd Edwards letter and will go down as soon as I can possibly leave. I want Parker to move out of the Black house, as I can then arrange matters more satisfactory, to myself, and all others concerned I am in hopes to make out for timber – could use 15 tons now, if I could get it next week but could not defer it, any longer. I suppose you could not get it here in that time. Please inform me the earliest moment that Parker removes.

Yours Truly

[p.130]

 

New Bedford May 19, 1853
Mr. Asa R Nye
Dear Sir
Your favor of 18th inst is recd. Also your Telegraph of yesterday. I answered “Bone sold to Willetts & Co if not accepted Telegraph your best offer”

I sold the bone to Capt Ricketson for Willetts & Co the 16th provided it was merchantable. You will please show them the bone when out, and if accepted have it weighed off to them, and send me the weighers return. – if not accepted I would like to hear from you by Telegraph
In relation to freight, and other expenses you may draw on me at sight, or I will send the money forward, as may best suit you

Yours Truly

 

New Bedford May 20th 1853
Mr Edward B. Gibbs
Dear Sir. Your favor of 19th inst is recd. In answer I would say you may cut 15 tons of fine timber on the Company lot if you can find it good, if not, on B. Bournes and get it here as soon as you possibly can as I find I need another load. I fear there is more trouble ahead in consequence of Fessendens stupidity. I soon expect to go to Head of the Bay tomorrow, but write for fear I may not. Should any person say anything to you in relation to the sale of the Homestead, and wood lot, [p.131] say you purchased the woodlots on your own account, and not as my agent, as you will remember, the conversation, which took place after the sale, that you bought it on your own account, but would sell it to me if I wanted it. These are matters you will keep to yourself unless questioned by others untill you see me when I will explain to you – get the timber as soon as possible, and let it be good

Yours Truly

 

New Bedford May 21st 1853
Capt Asa S. Tobey
Dear Sir. Your policy of Insurance on Bark Roscoe has expired. Please send it to me, and I will get it renewed without expense

Yours Truly

 

New Bedford May 24th 1853
Asa R. Nye Esq
Dear Sir
Enclosed please find original bill lading of bone for Magdala”. Your letter requesting it forwarded was mislaid – consequently the delay

Yours Truly

 

[p.132]

 

New Bedford May 24. 1853
Capt Theodore Cole
Dear Sir. Your favor of 16th inst is recd In reply to Your inquiries, I have not recd a letter from Capt Devoll since he sailed. You know he thinks a good deal of the dignity of a Master, and perhaps may not write his owners while he is absent. He commands a large ship, but got no more Oil than the little “Newton”. On the whole Capt Z. A. Devoll is a great man and perhaps may write me once during the Voyage, as Yet has sent home nothing. The Alexander Coffin shipped her bone 28000lb by Mogul of New London has not yet arrived. Could not ship Oil for want of a Vessel

Yours Truly

 

New Bedford May 24 1853
Mr E. B Gibbs
Dear Sir. I saw Mr Dana but he did not seem ready to make any bargain untill he had seen the place. I left him saying that any bargain you would make with him, I would be satisfied with. I thought. I thought the absence of his wife who had gone to Wareham had something to do with it. Perhaps she is the smartest man of the two. He agreed however to go down and see you – perhaps that night. If you agree with him please see B. Bourne about the cattle you spoke of as we shall need a [p.133] team as soon as we can get a man.
Let me hear from you soon – we shall need the timber as soon as we can have it.

Yours Truly

 

New Bedford May 30 1853
Mr E G. Peirce
Dear Sir. Enclosed I hand you one of Sylvester & Crams Cards, and find the head of the Rudder should be 2 feet 4 inches above deck – Thickness of Iron Shieves for Spars Fore and Main Topmast 2 1/8 inches. Mizen Topmast 1 ¾ inches, Top gallant Mast 1 5/8 inches, Fore and Main Yards 2 inches. Cup Jack 1 ¾ inch, Topsail Yard[?] 1 5/8 Inches.
The money I will forward on Friday.

Yours Truly

 

New Bedford May 30 1853
Mr Nathan Bourne
Dear Sir. Haveing concluded a bargain with a Mr. Dana to move on to the old Home stead, and he being desirous to move his family into the House immediately, I now wish you to remove Joshua,s family as agreed upon when I last saw you. Mary Anne can have her choice between H. G. Blacks house at Monument and the Caleb Percy house. I infer from what I can learn, that the house occupied by Mr Packer will not be vacated at present I hope there will be no difficulty in makeing [p.134] the move. Should there be please notify Mr Ellis, and he will call upon Abram Nye as it must be done now. In case there is no wood for the family if you will cut some of the refuse wood from the lot, I will see you paid. I expect to be in Monument in a few days, at present I am not well at all

Yours Truly

 

New Bedford May 30 1853
Mr E B. Gibbs
Dear Sir
On my return from Maine Saturday evening, I found your letter of the 27 inst. Mr Ellis goes to Monument tomorrow morning, and carries this letter also one for Nathan Bourne, with a request that he move Joshua,s family immediately, and if there is any trouble about that he will call upon A. Nye who will cause it to be done. In your bargain with Dana I hope there was an understanding about the hours of labor, as I would not engage any one who claims 10 hours for a days work. I expect to be in Monument soon. I am fearful we shall have to wait for the timber. Please write me soon as the house is clear

Yours Truly

[p.135]

 

New Bedford June 1 1853
Mr E G. Peirce
Dear Sir. Enclosed please find check on Bank Commerce Boston for five hundred Dollars on account of new Ship. Mr Green,s price for yellow Metal bolts, and spikes is 28 cents 6 [?] I infer from what I said to you about metal fulling might have misled you in regard to price in this market. I spoke of sheathing metal, not bolts or spikes. Sheathing metal has receeded from 30 to 22 or 3 cents.

I find on enquiring of my Carpenter that I shall need about 3000 feet of deck Plank face You will please ship me by the Schr John Randolph 3000 feet face of Spruce, and 500 feet face white pine, if you have so much to sell, and 50 Knees. Also when you will be ready for Sails, Rigging, Copper &c and when do you want Mr Crosby to put on the Boat Gear

Yours Truly

 

New Bedford June 3d 1853
Mr E B. Gibbs
Dear Sir. I learn from Mr Ellis that the prospect brightens in favor of Joshua,[s] family leaveing the Old Homestead.. When that is settled and they are off, and Dana ready to go in you may if you think they will answer a good purpose, purchase B. Bournes oxen and I will pay for them when I go down which will be, \as soon, as I get most of the premises being clear. I wish some one would purchase at a fair price as I have no doubt they [p.136] can/ the young creature which Joshua pretends to own. If I rember right it is a lively one, and as I have a plenty of pasture should like to have it – perhaps Moses Waterhouse would go down, and buy it for me if it is not too late. I hope they wont think of Carrying off my cow, as I should like to retain her upon the place. I am sorry to say that your brother Joshua is very ill, has been attacked with bleeding at the lungs – has had several attacks during the last three days, although now comfortable to day, still I think his case a very doubtful one

Yours Truly

 

New Bedford June 6, 1853
Capt Warren A. Bourne
My Dear Sir
I presume you have noticed the [arriving and sailing?] of the Ship “Stephania” from Talcahuano. I recd a letter from Capt Terry stateing that he arrived there, and I infer he had taken on Oil since leaving the Sandwich Islands. He stated that he could purchase Beef @ $12.00 Flour $8 pr Bbl. Casks $1.25 Shook, $1.00 pr Bbl. – his ship in good order, did not need any sails, or rigging for another cruise to the Arctic – Could ship his Oil by the ship Franklin of New Bedford @ 2.50 pr Bbl. which induced him to ship 943 Bbls, and fit again for another Cruise. Could sell sperm Oil for 1.18 pr gall, and pay all his bills. When I first obtained his letter I thought well of the project, if all this could be done [p.137] and no draft come to hand, and he stated there would be none, but last week there was a draft from him for $669 – which of course helps use up his ship bonus. He shipped his Bone from Sandwich Islands in Brig “Endeavor”[?] She has since been condemned at Society Island the bone was insured for 35 cents pr lb. the Oil I have insured. I have also cancelled my policy on Ship and Outfits, and have taken the liberty to cause you to be cancelled, and paid up to March 9th 1853 and reinsured at same Valuation In Case of loss of Ship. the underwriters cannot call for over[?] quarter of Catchings, which if I had not have done this according to the old policy they would have done. Hopeing this may meet with your approbations

I am Yours Truly

[P.S.] Has Thomas Swift sold his horse, if not will he do for a farm horse

 

C B. H Fessenden Esq
Dear Sir. I would enquire if you have ever had the Cedar Swamp and Pew in the Unitarian Meeting house belonging to my Fathers Estate appraised, and annexed to the second appraisal. If it has not been done I beg of you not to omit haveing it done before the application for a new license, as it may be made to appear, and with some slight grounds that a part of the property has been kept out off sight as ample time has elapsed, since we know the fact [p.138] that such property had not been appraised. Now Sir: Let me be assured that the proper steps be taken forthwith to accomplish this matter. I am waiting to hear from Mr Gibbs about a Mr Dana moveing on to the farm when I intend to go down. Dont find to see the Judge before 21st inst and set the matter of new application for license all right that we may be sure to obtain it. In relation to putting the full amount of note in I believe I shall not do it but from the circumstances of holding such a note. Prescott thinks there is no doubt but I shall obtain interest anually on my demand.

Yours Truly

 

New Bedford June 7, 1853
Capt Asa S. Tobey
Dear Sir. Your letter concerning Policy of Insurance on “Roscoe” is recd. The Bedford Commercial Ins Co have ceased to underwrite, and is winding up its business, consequently would not assume the risk. I of course demand it expedient to cause you to be insured immediately at the new office for 2% for six months from the last report, which was the most favorable time for you under the circumstances. Capt Tobey I would like to know your opinion of Mr Downing[?] for a mate of a ship. is he competent as a Navigator Officer, and whaleman. Is his judgement, habits, and disposition good. Please give me your opinion in full by return of Packet [p.139] or mail, as I am desirous of knowing immediately. I want you to speak fully and unreservedly, and, it shall be kept entirely to myself, whatever you may say.

Yours Truly

 

New Bedford June 7, 1853
Capt Richard Holly
Dear Sir. Your favor of yesterday is recd. I have shipped Mr Donaldson for 2d Mate of the Washington, but it took money and a high lay to do it, bit it is done and I think he will stick. I have him on the shipping paper and a written agreement beside. Now in relation to a Mate Mr Foster has shipped to go in the “Jefferson.” So he is out of the way. I went this morning to see the 2d mate of the Ocean last voyage, could not find him, will try again this afternoon. See what you can do with Smith Have written Capt Tobey about his 3d mate shall learn more about him by next mail

Yours Truly

P.S. Have seen Mr Hansen[?] 2d mate of the Ocean he is not very well just now. Will call and see me tomorrow, if well enough. I think he is a smart man but has but one eye will ship him if I can

[p.140]

 

New Bedford June 10th 1853
Mr E B. Gibbs
Dear Sir. I went to Capt Clarks house this morning, but he had just left to go on board his vessel. I sent Thomas Burgess to say to him that it would be a great disappointment to me unless he could take the June timber and if he would [take] it I would make the freight satisfactory to him, and if he concluded to take it Burgess was to let you know immediately. I hope he will do so but as the matter is in doubt and being anxious to know the result - wish you to write me without fail, by Mondays mail that I may obtain a vessel here to send for it if possible.

In relation to horse I saw Mr Chase’s and found him just what I wanted but he would not warrant him sound. I think however that he may prove so in the end although he stated, he had for the last year coughed at times and he would not say, but he feared that he had, or might have the heaves His price was $125 but not wish me to name it to anyone else as he had always asked more. I also saw Mr Clark’s Oxen. They are without exception, the best matched oxen that I ever looked upon, girth[?] about 6 feet 4 inches, price $125. will take I think $120, possibly $115, five years old this last spring, he says, no more. I got home about 3 Oclock, too late to get money out of the Bank if I had meant to do so, for either of those horses will decide and write you by Monday’s mail, in the mean time, you will please enquire about [p.141] Chase’s horse. I would have given to day for those Oxen $110. and I think from his last talk about them I may yet get them. I made no offer then. I saw the time had not come for him to take it and I was in no hurry. I merely wanted to look upon them. I still am of the opinion that Mr Collin’s horse is the cheapest horse I have seen, although Mr Chase’s would suite me the best decidedly if sound, his weight is 1067lb about the same as Mr C’s ~ found all well, as hopes. Your brother Joshua is decidedly better, which was very good news

Yours Truly

 

New Bedford June 11 1853
Capt Richard Holly
Dear Sir
Enclosed I hand you Cat Tobey’s letter in regard to Mr Downings qualifications for a chief mate. I dont want you should show, or say anything to any one in relation to it, as I have never said anything to Mr Downing, and dont know as I could get him if I wanted him. Please send back the letter Monday, and write me what you think of him

Yours Truly

[p.142]

 

New Bedford June 11th 1853
Mr E B. Gibbs
Dear Sir. Enclosed please find one hundred dollars to pay for horse, shall leavet he matter with you, although I would not offer Swift more than $75 for him at first, and if he declines that, $80 which is the full worth for a horse of his weight and age. I talked with Mr Bessy[?] who has used Mr Collin’s horse a good deal, and if he told the truth, Mr C has told us the truth about his horse. Also in the quantity of grain given him. Mr H. B’s opinion to the contrary notwithstanding, and from what I can learn of Mr Bessy I am inclined to think Collins sells his horse because he has no use for him and not from any fault of the horse. Unless you can learn more favorably of Swifts than what we know or something against Collin’s horse, I think I would purchase of Collins, which case you purchase send Mr Dana after him immediately tell him to get five Bushels Corn and give him what he needs according to the work done. Will take your waggon and cart home the Articles I have sent by Capt Bourne, put the shingles under cover, and when he turns the horse out to grass, let it be into the field beyond the corn which I intend for the horse as it is the best pasture on the farm Capt Bourne will take the timber if Clark has not already taken it, unless he backs down, you must urge him, and help him get it

Yours Truly

[p.143]

 

New Bedford June 11 1853
Messrs B Shaw In & Co
Gent
Please send me by Rail Road as I need them immediately 5000 1 inch Bungs 5000 7/8 inch do[ditto] 2000 1-1/8 in do 1000 1-1/4 in do. 5000 locust wedges half 1-1/4, half 1-1/8 inches - will pay for them when I go to Gardiner. You must not fail to have them sent through to New Bedford as I need them now

Yours Truly

 

New Bedford June 13 1853
Mr E G. Peirce
Dear Sir. Your letter of is recd In relation to standing knees I wish you to get for me 10 knees 10 inch, and they will all want to be square, and about half of them in square with large boddies as the ship round outboard and consequently hollow in board, which will require large boddies

Yours Truly

 

New Bedford June 14 1853
Mr Charles Smith
Dear Sir
I am in want of a mate for ship Washington – should be pleased to talk with you for that birth and if you will come to New Bedford in the Boat tomorrow and see me will [p.144] pay your Expenses

Very truly yours

 

New Bedford June 14th 1853
Capt Geo Gibbs
Dear Sir. I would like to enquire of you how Geo Greene performed during the time he was with you in the “Huntress” as Boat Steerer, and if you were going again would you take him in the same capacity. Your early answer will oblige.

Yours Truly

 

New Bedford June 15 1853
C B. H. Fessenden Esq
Dear Sir. Referring to my respects of the 6th inst I will here say that I have called at your office during your absence. I will again state that I am depending upon you entirely to take care of my matters in relation to the license to sell – hopeing that all matters will be attended to in due time say the 21st inst

I remain
Yours Truly

[p.145]

 

New Bedford June 15 1853
Mr E G. Peirce
Dear Sir
Yours of 13th inst is recd I will send the money as desired. In relation to Mr Crosby going down to set the Boat Gear he says it is impossible for him to leave at this time as he has other new ships now on hand to fit with gear – think it will be better for all concerned to let the ship come here – with the Davits and what stuff you have got out, and I am inclined to believe it will be so as you have no Machine to bend the Iron Davits with.

You stated, you wanted to know the name in order to fit the head boards. I have decided to call her the Kingfisher, what say you to this? I shall ship by the Schooner John Randolph Metal nails Tarred Paper ~ chains, anchors, Rigging &c The Anchor stocks I hope you will make of oak if convenient and have them larger in the middle as the anchors were for Iron stocks which makes them a little larger when the stock goes on. You have said nothing about Bobstay Shackles shall I get? I saw Mr Hillman this P.M. he seemed Anxious to know when you intended to launch. I thought was inclined to visit Gardiner – said he had relatives in that vicinity &c

Yours truly

[p.146]

 

New Bedford June 16, 1853
Mr C C. Smith
Dear Sir
Your letter of yesterday is recd. I would like to have you come in tomorrows Boat

Yours Truly

 

New Bedford June 16, 1853
Messrs R Coady & Co
Gent. I hereby authorize you to draw on me at sight from San Francisco for three hundred fifteen dollars, the amount of freight and primage on one hundred Bbls Provisions, shipped from New York to Honolulu Sandwich Islands for Ship “Nestorian”. I am inclined to beleive from the large shipments which have been made to Sandwich Islands that exchange will rule at a low figure, and that it would not be for my interest to place funds at the Islands in anticipation. A portion of the provisions is intended for the Ship Stehania Capt Terry. The balance (should any remain and I presume there will as she will only need supplies for passage home) you may turn over to any other of my ships that may want it, and when you are satisfied that my fleet is all in that intend to visit your Islands, you will dispose of the remainder and pay over to either of my masters, or place it to my credit

Yours Truly

[p.147]

 

New Bedford, June 17, 1853
Mr E G. Peirce
Dear Sir. Enclosed please find check on Bank of Commerce Boston for Two thousand dollars on account new Ship King fisher The Chains, Anchors, Sails, Rigging,Yellow metals nails &c left this morning at 9 Oclock on board of the Schr Ann Maria Capt Geo O. Phinney and I think will arrive at your place tomorrow night if the wind holds. When I wrote you last I expected to ship them by the Schr John Randolph but was able to charter the Ann Maria on more favorable terms to carry these articles for new ship and take back a load of ashes and lumber for the farm and the Master is acquainted with such business. I have sent down by the Schr a man by the name of Smith who was Boat Steerer in one of my Ships. He is to help get the new ship ready for sea and come up in her – will here state to you that his habits are bad, being givin to drink, and therefore not reliable. You will therefore have the directions of the Articles sent untill some one Arrives to take charge. I think now of going myself in next Tuesdays Boat and perhaps Capt Cox will go with me. I took the responsibility of haveing Cast a Bob stay petal but it was too late to get it on board, the Vessel packed before it was got ready. Will send it forward unless I have orders from you to the contrary.

In relation to sails, Rigging &c If there could be a temporary shed upon the whaf to shelter them I think it would the better plan for the most [p.148] of them to be stored at present or untill the ship is launched. The remaining rigging and blocks might be put below decks.

Yours truly

P.S. Enclosed is the Invoice of Yellow Metal. Smith will remain in the Schr untill I arrive

 

New Bedford June 17, 1853
Messrs Sylvester & Cram
Gent
You may send to Gardiner Maine to the care of Elbridge G. Peirce, one of Reeds Patent Steerers same size or number, and same length of shape as made for E W. Howland of our City / ship 430 Tons / send by Steamer “Ocean”. As I am a stranger to you I will refer you to Saml Downes &c or Geo A. Simmons. I hope you will be particular and use the best stock, as the ship is bound on a long Voyage and where it cannot be repaired

Yours Truly

[p.149]

 

New Bedford June 18 1853
Mr E B. Gibbs
Dear Sir
Your note by Edwd and yours of 17th is recd. In relation go Abraham Nye, Oxen, if they are as large as I need, and you are satisfied they will work together, you will purchase them forthwith perhaps a direct offer of $75 will get them. You can try it ~ if not give the price asked if you think best. I have chartered Capt Phinney who brought the timber here to go last. He left here yesterday morning for Gardiner, to take a cargo of ashes and lumber, to deliver at the Riding Place below Uncle Charles’~ think his Vessel will fetch 2000 Bushels, and what timber, and lumber will be necessary for the Barn. As for the house you can keep a look out, and when I go down again will go with you, and see what can be done ~ No danger of their rising on Oxan either. I saw Mr Fessenden when he was here Thursday, and recd a letter from him Yesterday. He had seen the Judge of Probate and has no doubt things will be got along without any trouble. In relation to Mr Dana’s bargain, perhaps it will be as well for him to understand that Fesseenden holds the deeds of the farm, and what I do is by his order. Such seems to be the state of the case at present, that this is the only safe course to pursue, and you will say to him that Mr Fessenden is the true and legal representative of the property, and [p.150] when you purchase, purchase in your own name and for the farm

Yours truly

 

New Bedford June 24, 1853
Mr Jackson Lane
Dear Sir. Yours of 14th inst is recd The Stephania was at Talcahuano the 15th of March of the present year bound for the Arctic another season. Whether your son is on board of her I cannot say, as I have heard nothing from him since the ship sailed.
The Stephania will probably be in in the spring

Yours Truly
Jona Bourne Jr
Per Geo W Ellis

 

New Bedford June 27 1853
Mess Sylvester & Crame
Gent
I regret that I should have committed the error in length of Ships Steering apparatus on the l7 inst as your usual length of shaft would have answered, I now learn from Mr Howland that he had added 11 inches, and as I learned when in your place Friday morning that you shorten this [p.151] if I desired it without any further charge You may take off 5 inches of the 11 added and send it forward, as directed in my letter of the 17th and send the bill to me

Yours truly

 

New Bedford June 27, 1853
Mr E G. Peirce
Dear Sir
Since my return I have thought a good deal of the manner in which Mr Osgood had done the Calking I hope, and trust, you will not allow the ship to come here untill she is put in perfect order so far as calking is concerned

In relation to sheathing, and coppering, I took some pains to observe the height that they were sheathing the “Reindeer” Capt Howlands new ship ~ She is 17 feet deep has a keel 30 inches deep apr. 25 inches forward, is sheathed 18 feet forward and 17 feet 3 inches apr. I measured the spce from the top of her planking in the waist to top of her sheathing 4 feet 11 inches. Coppered to 16 ft 8 in forward, 17 feet 2 inches apr. I would like to hear from you and learn how you have progressed since I left, and if Mr Osgood is Caulking. Will send 3 coppering punches tomorrow

Yours truly

[p.152]

 

New Bedford, June 28 1853
Messr Williams & Barnes, New London
Gent
Your favor of 27th is recd, apprising me of the arrival of the Mogul with bone from Ship “Alex Coffin” as it is not convenient for me to leave home just at this time., I would ask the favor of you to ship the bone direct to New Bedford if a vessel can be found comeing to our place. If not, ship it to New York in some good vessel, and with the understanding that she shall put it on board of some New Bedford Packet at Peck Slip Your bill of freight and Capt Pennington’s order please send to some friend here, and I will settle the same ~ Should any damage appear, please advise me, that I may take the propper steps to obtain Insurance

Very truly Yours

 

New Bedford July 1st, 1853
Mr E G. Pierce
Dear Sir. I have sent you this day by Express two Calkers punches for coppering purposes. I am very glad to learn that the ship is to be caulked all over, as I positively beleive unless it was done before sheathing we should have trouble [p.153] before the end of the Voyage, and at the best have to take the sheathing off before sending her on the second.

There is now in process of sheathing these new ships, the “Reindeer”, Lapwing”, and the “Sea Breeze”, all of which was well caulked on the stocks, but they have been compelled to have them done all over outboard before sheathing, as the Underwriters would require it to be done. I hope you will see that this part of the work is well done as I rather pay myself, that to have it slighted and when well done, put on a good coat of pitch and I shall have no fear.

You say you can purchase for me fifty thousand brick, all when deliver’d along side the ship, and all hard brick for 5 $ pr [M (million?)]. You may purchase, to be delivered when I want them for ballast If you will write me the middle of next week, perhaps I will go down

Yours truly

P.S. You say the Anchors are in rather bad shape to stock. I thought when I had them fitted you would find no trouble in putting on a good shaped stock only increase your stock in the middle and I have no doubt they will look very well.

[p.154]

 

[Transcriptions converted to html format by Mark Procknik, 20 January 2011]